Wonder Years (Non Political)

IUCrazy2

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So growing up, the original version of this show was something I was a fan of. It was a little glimpse into the world my parents grew up in. And at the time there would be pieces of the show where you would think, hey I am sorry I missed out on that.

I was born in one of those quirky years where I am a young Gen X who has old millenials as siblings and as a wife. And looking back on that time, I think I was the last generation of kids to not really be so tech dependent. Yeah it was there, I remember dialing up and "You Got Mail!" but it was not as omnipresent as it is today. I was a latchkey kid, which really meant that my friends and I were left to our own devices from about the age of 9 or so and we had to kind of do some growing up because of it.

Anyways, I think we all have those "wonder years" that we look back to, what are yours? Is there something you think kids today miss out on? Is there stuff they have today that you feel you missed out on?

Edit to add: When they first announced this show I was thinking, oh great another remake where they either gender or race swap the main characters and do it all over again...and they are doing it in a period that is the Grandparents of today. It would have been like the original having been set in the 1940s....BUT...I have seen a few trailers and such and this actually looks like it may have some promise. I hope it can catch the heart of the original.
 

mcmurtry66

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So growing up, the original version of this show was something I was a fan of. It was a little glimpse into the world my parents grew up in. And at the time there would be pieces of the show where you would think, hey I am sorry I missed out on that.

I was born in one of those quirky years where I am a young Gen X who has old millenials as siblings and as a wife. And looking back on that time, I think I was the last generation of kids to not really be so tech dependent. Yeah it was there, I remember dialing up and "You Got Mail!" but it was not as omnipresent as it is today. I was a latchkey kid, which really meant that my friends and I were left to our own devices from about the age of 9 or so and we had to kind of do some growing up because of it.

Anyways, I think we all have those "wonder years" that we look back to, what are yours? Is there something you think kids today miss out on? Is there stuff they have today that you feel you missed out on?

Edit to add: When they first announced this show I was thinking, oh great another remake where they either gender or race swap the main characters and do it all over again...and they are doing it in a period that is the Grandparents of today. It would have been like the original having been set in the 1940s....BUT...I have seen a few trailers and such and this actually looks like it may have some promise. I hope it can catch the heart of the original.
Loved the wonder years. The episode where he goes to work with his dad and sees the crap he has to put up with. The disappointments of the brother. Just a great great show
 
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larsIU

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So growing up, the original version of this show was something I was a fan of. It was a little glimpse into the world my parents grew up in. And at the time there would be pieces of the show where you would think, hey I am sorry I missed out on that.

I was born in one of those quirky years where I am a young Gen X who has old millenials as siblings and as a wife. And looking back on that time, I think I was the last generation of kids to not really be so tech dependent. Yeah it was there, I remember dialing up and "You Got Mail!" but it was not as omnipresent as it is today. I was a latchkey kid, which really meant that my friends and I were left to our own devices from about the age of 9 or so and we had to kind of do some growing up because of it.

Anyways, I think we all have those "wonder years" that we look back to, what are yours? Is there something you think kids today miss out on? Is there stuff they have today that you feel you missed out on?

Edit to add: When they first announced this show I was thinking, oh great another remake where they either gender or race swap the main characters and do it all over again...and they are doing it in a period that is the Grandparents of today. It would have been like the original having been set in the 1940s....BUT...I have seen a few trailers and such and this actually looks like it may have some promise. I hope it can catch the heart of the original.
Gen X checking in (1975)

Latchkey from the age of ten

Leave house in the morning. Come home when dark. Nobody knew what the hell we were doing or even where we were.

Stealing cigarettes from the neighbor’s outdoor freezer.

4 channels until 1986 so TV was really an adult thing except for the Saturday morning toons.

Tackle football in the neighborhood with kids ranging from 8 to 15. (and like 15 to a side)

BB gun wars

Endless basketball games including in the dead of winter. Scraped the pavement and wiped down with newspaper. Kept hands warm by putting over the coals from neighbors wood stove. (Thanks Marilyn!)
 

IUCrazy2

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Gen X checking in (1975)

Latchkey from the age of ten

Leave house in the morning. Come home when dark. Nobody knew what the hell we were doing or even where we were.

Stealing cigarettes from the neighbor’s outdoor freezer.

4 channels until 1986 so TV was really an adult thing except for the Saturday morning toons.

Tackle football in the neighborhood with kids ranging from 8 to 15. (and like 15 to a side)

BB gun wars

Endless basketball games including in the dead of winter. Scraped the pavement and wiped down with newspaper. Kept hands warm by putting over the coals from neighbors wood stove. (Thanks Marilyn!)
You have me by 3 years, pretty similar experiences growing up. You kind of got with your friends and went out and found something to do until it was time to eat dinner. Sometimes that was pickup sports (usually basketball or football) or you found some other trouble to get into. Like fireworks were still illegal in Indiana, so getting your hands on those to blow stuff up was like the Holy Grail in late elementary. My friend and I built a fire pit in his backyard and played the "what happens if we burn this" type of game.

Saturday morning cartoons, the Sunday comics, the sports page the day after your team won a game, waiting to see the AP rankings where Indiana was at so you could argue with your friends at lunch about who was better....Sports Center before school in the morning where you got actual highlights instead of opinions on top of opinions. Ahh... the good old days.
 

IUCrazy2

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The Wonder Years was a 1988 show about 1968+. That show today would be about the happenings in 2001. Mind blowing.
Crazy isn't it? Time waits for no one.

And I know as a kid in 1988, 1968 felt so long ago. 2001 feels like yesterday.
 
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larsIU

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You have me by 3 years, pretty similar experiences growing up. You kind of got with your friends and went out and found something to do until it was time to eat dinner. Sometimes that was pickup sports (usually basketball or football) or you found some other trouble to get into. Like fireworks were still illegal in Indiana, so getting your hands on those to blow stuff up was like the Holy Grail in late elementary. My friend and I built a fire pit in his backyard and played the "what happens if we burn this" type of game.

Saturday morning cartoons, the Sunday comics, the sports page the day after your team won a game, waiting to see the AP rankings where Indiana was at so you could argue with your friends at lunch about who was better....Sports Center before school in the morning where you got actual highlights instead of opinions on top of opinions. Ahh... the good old days.
Speaking of burning. We burned down a 40 foot tree in the woods by our house. God we were dumb. And lucky.

Cousin lived in the Region so we always got the fireworks hookup every year.

Also breakdancing. Hilarious.
 

IUCrazy2

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The Wonder Years was a 1988 show about 1968+. That show today would be about the happenings in 2001. Mind blowing.
Also, is it just me or does it seem like things have just kind of gone into autopilot since 2001? Like culturally, yeah we have the phones that are supercomputers in our pockets (comparatively) but from a music or artistic standpoint, we just kind of seem to have stood still. The changes to things like movies and music from 1968 to 1988 were pretty large IMO. That doesn't really seem to be the case for 2001 to 2021, at least not where I sit. Someone dropped into 1988 from 1968 and listened to the radio would be able to say, "man...rock has changed a bit". I don't think you can really say that for popular music today. There has not really been that next big thing. NSYNC could be BTS and vice versa.
 
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IUCrazy2

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Speaking of burning. We burned down a 40 foot tree in the woods by our house. God we were dumb. And lucky.

Cousin lived in the Region so we always got the fireworks hookup every year.

Also breakdancing. Hilarious.
Ha...that is kind of how our fire pit came to an end. My friend had fireworks and we were in a drought...burnt down a neighbor's decorative evergreen tree and his parents shut us down.
 

Cortez88

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Also, is it just me or does it seem like things have just kind of gone into autopilot since 2001? Like culturally, yeah we have the phones that are supercomputers in our pockets (comparatively) but from a music or artistic standpoint, we just kind of seem to have stood still. The changes to things like movies and music from 1968 to 1988 were pretty large IMO. That doesn't really seem to be the case for 2001 to 2021, at least not where I sit. Someone dropped into 1988 from 1968 and listened to the radio would be able to say, "man...rock has changed a bit". I don't think you can really say that for popular music today. There has not really been that next big thing. NSYNC could be BTS and vice versa.
Interesting. I’m a Gen X and graduated undergrad without having email. That seems like 100 years ago.
 

IUCrazy2

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Interesting. I’m a Gen X and graduated undergrad without having email. That seems like 100 years ago.
Yeah but that would have been pre 2001. Like I said, I am that age group where I have been called like the in betweens, young Gen X, not quite millenial. We had email when I was at IU (1997 to 2001) but it was the old Shakespeare green screen stuff. We did not get the more web based mail until I was about out the door. We had high speed internet in the dorms but I did not have it in my off campus apartment. I got it after graduation. But to me it kind of feels like things sort of slowed then. Facebook was starting as I left school. Myspace was there. So the social media thing was just starting to kick into gear.

I don't know, I guess I can look at stuff or listen to things and say "70's, 80's, 90's..." but when you get to the 2000's, stuff just kind of starts to run together. There does not seem to be that delineation by decade.

Could just be me.
 

hoot1

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Enjoyed watching Ozzie and Harriet, All in the Family, and the Wonder Years at different points in my life, and I wasn't what you would call a big television watcher.

However, none of these shows reflected my family experiences about which I have fond memories. Nor did i think they represented a typical American family to a great extent, much less be be an accurate look into the time frame in which they aired.
 

cosmickid

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Interesting. I’m a Gen X and graduated undergrad without having email. That seems like 100 years ago.
Want to hear something crazy? On a lark, I took some sort of business computing course, as either a senior or in grad school at IU. My major was comparative politics/Intl relations but most of my friends were business majors, although Kelley School wasn't even a thing yet. Would've been like 78 or so...

Anyway, we had to write out these programs in fortran and then turn the keypunch cards into the "computing center", which if I remember right was like a guard shack on the street in front of IMU. A week or so later they'd give you a printout which was what you turned in for your grade.

Never imagined there'd come a day when we'd have anything like a PC. I used to have to pay people to type papers for me on a freaking typewriter. I'd give them 2 or 3 handwritten pages with everything crammed into the margins on both sides and they'd end up with a finished product of 6 or 7 typewritten pages. I guess that, along with bluebook essay exams in poly sci and history is where my lengthy response to questions/arguments originated.
 

Bulk VanderHuge

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The Southern Sun
Born in 1962 here, and I think I have said what a small town I grew up in. Starting in late elementary school, I can remember summer lasting FOREVER (Memorial Day to Labor Day). My bike was the most important thing I owned. Rode it all over town and out into the country from morning until dark. Mom even gave me a couple of dollars to get lunch at the hamburger place "downtown". Spent all day with friends inventing things to do. I remember a game of "war" (capture the flag with toy guns) that included over 20 kids and stretched out for miles...and lasted all day, then hide and seek games that were just as big at night. I remember pick up baseball games (who does that any more?) at the junior high field. I also remember 2 on 2 whiffle ball tournaments, tackle football, and basketball until it got too dark to see the goal.

Even though my home town has been on a long, slow death spiral, when I was growing up, it had a bustling little retail area full of mom and pop shops (clothing, jewelry, dime store, sporting good, etc), and everyone knew everyone. One of my favorite memories is all the little neighborhood grocery stores all over town. One in particular is where I bought my baseball cards/chewing gum. Sure wish I had those cards from the late 60's.

I remember watching the moon landing on a black and white TV, and making that little lunar lander thing out of cardboard, with the tabs and holes and flaps. We bought a ping pong table with green stamps, and that's where I learned how competitive my dad was. I remember the Pinewood Derby in Cub Scouts (our town wasn't big enough for Boy Scouts, so that's where it ended...meetings were held in the basement of the Presbyterian Church in the Fellowship Hall. I also remember VBS every summer at my own church.

I know this all sounds like some "Leave it to Beaver" bullcrap, but my childhood was fun, uneventful, and pretty "Wonder Years ish".
 

IUCrazy2

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Born in 1962 here, and I think I have said what a small town I grew up in. Starting in late elementary school, I can remember summer lasting FOREVER (Memorial Day to Labor Day). My bike was the most important thing I owned. Rode it all over town and out into the country from morning until dark. Mom even gave me a couple of dollars to get lunch at the hamburger place "downtown". Spent all day with friends inventing things to do. I remember a game of "war" (capture the flag with toy guns) that included over 20 kids and stretched out for miles...and lasted all day, then hide and seek games that were just as big at night. I remember pick up baseball games (who does that any more?) at the junior high field. I also remember 2 on 2 whiffle ball tournaments, tackle football, and basketball until it got too dark to see the goal.

Even though my home town has been on a long, slow death spiral, when I was growing up, it had a bustling little retail area full of mom and pop shops (clothing, jewelry, dime store, sporting good, etc), and everyone knew everyone. One of my favorite memories is all the little neighborhood grocery stores all over town. One in particular is where I bought my baseball cards/chewing gum. Sure wish I had those cards from the late 60's.

I remember watching the moon landing on a black and white TV, and making that little lunar lander thing out of cardboard, with the tabs and holes and flaps. We bought a ping pong table with green stamps, and that's where I learned how competitive my dad was. I remember the Pinewood Derby in Cub Scouts (our town wasn't big enough for Boy Scouts, so that's where it ended...meetings were held in the basement of the Presbyterian Church in the Fellowship Hall. I also remember VBS every summer at my own church.

I know this all sounds like some "Leave it to Beaver" bullcrap, but my childhood was fun, uneventful, and pretty "Wonder Years ish".
It sounds like it was great.
 

Bulk VanderHuge

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It sounds like it was great.
I was extremely insulated from what was going on in the rest of the country in the 60's/70's, even though I had older siblings. I'm not sure I ever really was aware of all the political turmoil going on, although I do remember Nixon leaving the White House in the helicopter in disgrace (like you-know-who ;) )
 

CO. Hoosier

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So growing up, the original version of this show was something I was a fan of. It was a little glimpse into the world my parents grew up in. And at the time there would be pieces of the show where you would think, hey I am sorry I missed out on that.

I was born in one of those quirky years where I am a young Gen X who has old millenials as siblings and as a wife. And looking back on that time, I think I was the last generation of kids to not really be so tech dependent. Yeah it was there, I remember dialing up and "You Got Mail!" but it was not as omnipresent as it is today. I was a latchkey kid, which really meant that my friends and I were left to our own devices from about the age of 9 or so and we had to kind of do some growing up because of it.

Anyways, I think we all have those "wonder years" that we look back to, what are yours? Is there something you think kids today miss out on? Is there stuff they have today that you feel you missed out on?

Edit to add: When they first announced this show I was thinking, oh great another remake where they either gender or race swap the main characters and do it all over again...and they are doing it in a period that is the Grandparents of today. It would have been like the original having been set in the 1940s....BUT...I have seen a few trailers and such and this actually looks like it may have some promise. I hope it can catch the heart of the original.
Combine the movies American Grafitti and Rebel Without a Cause and overlay that with Jean Shepherd’s book Wanda Hickey’s Night of Golden Memories for the proper location ( The Region) and you have my youth. Loved most all of it. Back then we had so many lived experiences, the good, the bad, snd the ugly. Nothing virtual. All real life. My favorite time of life is a close race between law school and retirement. One is full of optimism and the other is full of memories. Greatest adventure was riding the Big Sur coast on our tandem. One day was about 65 miles with 5,000 feet of climbing. My stoker will take that accomplishment with her forever. I don’t think anybody will take a virtual experience with them anywhere. You have to live, do, and then remember. Kids (and adults) who give up real activities for virtual stuff miss a lot.
 

larsIU

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Combine the movies American Grafitti and Rebel Without a Cause and overlay that with Jean Shepherd’s book Wanda Hickey’s Night of Golden Memories for the proper location ( The Region) and you have my youth. Loved most all of it. Back then we had so many lived experiences, the good, the bad, snd the ugly. Nothing virtual. All real life. My favorite time of life is a close race between law school and retirement. One is full of optimism and the other is full of memories. Greatest adventure was riding the Big Sur coast on our tandem. One day was about 65 miles with 5,000 feet of climbing. My stoker will take that accomplishment with her forever. I don’t think anybody will take a virtual experience with them anywhere. You have to live, do, and then remember. Kids (and adults) who give up real activities for virtual stuff miss a lot.
I often wonder how kids today will remember things later in life. So many memories are triggered or enhanced by smells, textures, and sounds. I “remember” how I felt when I relive an experience. Virtual doesn’t provide that sensory feedback in my experience
 

UncleMark

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I used to have to pay people to type papers for me on a freaking typewriter. I'd give them 2 or 3 handwritten pages with everything crammed into the margins on both sides and they'd end up with a finished product of 6 or 7 typewritten pages.

Same here. Mid 70s. One year I had to do a paper for a Poly Sci course and a History course. I wrote one paper that would work for both. Gave the manuscript to the typist and told her when I needed them. She called on the date I'd given her (they were due in class the following day). I went to pick them up. She did a great job -- even complimented me on the content -- but there was only one copy. I asked her where the other copy was, and she gave me an Oh Fvck look. I wasn't about to try and turn in a photocopy, so she had to type another copy that night for me to pick up in the morning.

Got an A on both.

Now that I'm thinking about it, I recall another time when I turned in a handwritten paper that should have been typed. I think I plead poverty about not having the money to pay a typist, but might be able to get it accomplished if I had another day or two. He took a quick look and said he'd take it the way it was. I'm glad I paid attention to my elementary school penmanship lessons. Pretty sure he gave me a good grade and didn't ding me for it.
 

Bulk VanderHuge

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Same here. Mid 70s. One year I had to do a paper for a Poly Sci course and a History course. I wrote one paper that would work for both. Gave the manuscript to the typist and told her when I needed them. She called on the date I'd given her (they were due in class the following day). I went to pick them up. She did a great job -- even complimented me on the content -- but there was only one copy. I asked her where the other copy was, and she gave me an Oh Fvck look. I wasn't about to try and turn in a photocopy, so she had to type another copy that night for me to pick up in the morning.

Got an A on both.

Now that I'm thinking about it, I recall another time when I turned in a handwritten paper that should have been typed. I think I plead poverty about not having the money to pay a typist, but might be able to get it accomplished if I had another day or two. He took a quick look and said he'd take it the way it was. I'm glad I paid attention to my elementary school penmanship lessons. Pretty sure he gave me a good grade and didn't ding me for it.
My parents got me a portable Smith/Corona electric typewriter (with correction cartridge) for graduation, and very early on in college, I realized that typing had been my most important class.
 

hoot1

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Combine the movies American Grafitti and Rebel Without a Cause and overlay that with Jean Shepherd’s book Wanda Hickey’s Night of Golden Memories for the proper location ( The Region) and you have my youth. Loved most all of it. Back then we had so many lived experiences, the good, the bad, snd the ugly. Nothing virtual. All real life. My favorite time of life is a close race between law school and retirement. One is full of optimism and the other is full of memories. Greatest adventure was riding the Big Sur coast on our tandem. One day was about 65 miles with 5,000 feet of climbing. My stoker will take that accomplishment with her forever. I don’t think anybody will take a virtual experience with them anywhere. You have to live, do, and then remember. Kids (and adults) who give up real activities for virtual stuff miss a lot.
CoH, thank you for this honest and beautiful review of your life experience. Think most of us can relate as we look back on our expectations and final years..

"My favorite time of life is a close race between law school and retirement. One is full of optimism and the other is full of memories."
 

Noodle

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Born in 1963 here, and had my own website by ~1993/4 (a book I have says October of 1995, but that’s not entirely accurate). Busted a hacker in 1996 (dumbass was using his work IP address to try to shutdown part of my website). First used email in 1985 I believe, but first computer class was FORTRAN and punchcards (1981). First paper I wrote on a computer was in 1984 or 1985, yet I also used an analog computer in 1985 (it had vacuum tubes and you “programmed” it by moving wires around!). First personal computer I used was in 1985. Created my first computer database in 1985 or 1986 (for respirator fitting data). Used tape drives to store the data. First used a spreadsheet program in 1987 (Lotus 123) to figure out why the refinery plant I was responsible for was having stability issues. Accessed computer bulletin boards as early as 1991 (300 baud modem!).
And things now are nothing like they were 20 years ago. 2001 seems like a lifetime ago.
 

UncleMark

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I know this all sounds like some "Leave it to Beaver" bullcrap, but my childhood was fun, uneventful, and pretty "Wonder Years ish".

Enjoying hearing you guys all reminiscence. Kind of jealous, actually.

My dad owned and operated an outdoor recreational facility. Outwardly, it would look like I had an idyllic childhood. But other than my two little brothers (who were no fun) the only people I got to hang with in the summers were my dad and the other adults that worked for him. By the time I was 12, I was on the payroll full time and over the years was given increasingly serious work and increasing responsibility. By the time I was 16 I was running one major part of the operation -- I was hiring the college kids that worked their summers there and they reported to me.

I never got to actually play, to be a kid, to have fun with close kid friends. My dad was proud of me and bragged on me and I lapped that shit up, but I think I grew up too fast, too soon.
 

UncleMark

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I Fing knew that was coming.
giphy.gif
 

CO. Hoosier

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I often wonder how kids today will remember things later in life. So many memories are triggered or enhanced by smells, textures, and sounds. I “remember” how I felt when I relive an experience. Virtual doesn’t provide that sensory feedback in my experience
When we reminisce with our adult kids, it’s interesting how our memories of the same events differ. Sometimes they have distinct memories of things I have no recollection of. Fortunately they have many positive memories.
 
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Joe_Hoopsier

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Ha...that is kind of how our fire pit came to an end. My friend had fireworks and we were in a drought...burnt down a neighbor's decorative evergreen tree and his parents shut us down.
I bet you got serious Creed from that one ! clap clap clap.
 
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Crayfish57

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Want to hear something crazy? On a lark, I took some sort of business computing course, as either a senior or in grad school at IU. My major was comparative politics/Intl relations but most of my friends were business majors, although Kelley School wasn't even a thing yet. Would've been like 78 or so...

Anyway, we had to write out these programs in fortran and then turn the keypunch cards into the "computing center", which if I remember right was like a guard shack on the street in front of IMU. A week or so later they'd give you a printout which was what you turned in for your grade.

Never imagined there'd come a day when we'd have anything like a PC. I used to have to pay people to type papers for me on a freaking typewriter. I'd give them 2 or 3 handwritten pages with everything crammed into the margins on both sides and they'd end up with a finished product of 6 or 7 typewritten pages. I guess that, along with bluebook essay exams in poly sci and history is where my lengthy response to questions/arguments originated.
Never imagined there'd come a day when we'd have anything like a PC. I used to have to pay people to type papers for me on a freaking typewriter. I'd give them 2 or 3 handwritten pages with everything crammed into the margins on both sides and they'd end up with a finished product of 6 or 7 typewritten pages. I guess that, along with bluebook essay exams in poly sci and history is where my lengthy response to questions/arguments originated



I think we are all very aware and most of us regret it.
 

Cortez88

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Also, is it just me or does it seem like things have just kind of gone into autopilot since 2001? Like culturally, yeah we have the phones that are supercomputers in our pockets (comparatively) but from a music or artistic standpoint, we just kind of seem to have stood still. The changes to things like movies and music from 1968 to 1988 were pretty large IMO. That doesn't really seem to be the case for 2001 to 2021, at least not where I sit. Someone dropped into 1988 from 1968 and listened to the radio would be able to say, "man...rock has changed a bit". I don't think you can really say that for popular music today. There has not really been that next big thing. NSYNC could be BTS and vice versa.
Music is a big one. 70s, 80s, and into the mid 90s have distinct sounds. Things have kind of plateaued, especially in the generic rock space. Maybe I’m just getting old.
 
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Marvin the Martian

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I am four years younger than Kevin Arnold was, and really felt his life was very similar to mine. I recall neighbor kids (and a brother) going off to Vietnam starting when I was about 6. My dad was more Archie Bunker, my other brother more Michael Stivic. For reasons unknown, my neighborhood lacked a Winnie Cooper, it was all boys. The original Wonder Years resonated with me.
 

IU_Hickory

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I was organizing my music and was pondering if 80s/90s music is now considered oldies? Does what we previously consider oldies (like beatles and beach boys) become stone age music or just combine all the music into just oldies?
 

UncleMark

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I was organizing my music and was pondering if 80s/90s music is now considered oldies? Does what we previously consider oldies (like beatles and beach boys) become stone age music or just combine all the music into just oldies?

Draw a line at 1975. Everything before goes in the Good section. Everything after goes in the Shit section. You're then allowed to make a handful of adjustments, but there shouldn't be many.
 
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IU_Hickory

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Draw a line at 1975. Everything before goes in the Good section. Everything after goes in the Shit section. You're then allowed to make a handful of adjustments, but there shouldn't be many.

What? Britney Spears, Backstreet Boys and Justin Bieber didn't make the cut? lol
 
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BCCHoosier

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Sep 5, 2001
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I was organizing my music and was pondering if 80s/90s music is now considered oldies? Does what we previously consider oldies (like beatles and beach boys) become stone age music or just combine all the music into just oldies?
Born in 72 and my formative years were spent growing up in Terre Haute. All of these posts resonate. I just remember being outside all day and the variety of stuff we did.

Sports of every type, fishing, building ramps to jump, swimming at the various public pools and creeks. We used to build BMX bike tracks in the woods. Nothing like 10-14 year olds with saws, pics, and shovels.

The bike was key to getting around. We used to bike out to Seelyville where a little old lady ran a store and would sell us chewing tobacco. I was not a smoker, but remember friends buying cigarettes at the vending machine at Pizza Inn. My kids today find the cigarette vending machine to be a hilarious concept.

Thanks for the post. Great to not have a pissing match for once.