What If?

Army88

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NCAA football delays start until first week in February 2021?
It would seem safer, IMO
? Safer: possible vaccine, better knowledge of treatment!
Financial: Would a Delayed full season (or at least conference only) with fans-in -stands,
result in higher revenue than a season that starts then stops, with no fans because of too much risk?
 

vesuvius13

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NCAA football delays start until first week in February 2021?
It would seem safer, IMO
? Safer: possible vaccine, better knowledge of treatment!
Financial: Would a Delayed full season (or at least conference only) with fans-in -stands,
result in higher revenue than a season that starts then stops, with no fans because of too much risk?
Many problems with this idea although there are good points made. First of February would really cut out teams in the north of the country due to weather. It would also be going to basketball especially in the tournament, players with a good chance of going to NFL would likely sit out getting ready for the draft, etc. This virus seems to run for 6 to 7 weeks in areas and then not as big problem in that area. It is too early to change the football to spring.
 
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destewart

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A three month football season starting in February would go head to head with the heart of college basketball’s conference season and the NCAA Basketball Tournament, the start of MLB season, the conclusion of regular seasons of the NBA and NHL.
 
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Army88

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Doesn’t the beginning of basketball fight end of fb and bowls/playoffs now?
Anyway you cut it-it’s SH!+!!
And. What’s colder- Ann Arbor on thanksgiving or Feb. 1?
My main question: What generates more revenue. 3-6 games in the fall or 8-10 in the spring? I don’t know myself-asking those that might.
But I am assuming trouble in the fall with a better handle on the virus in the spring
 
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i'vegotwinners

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by spring, perhaps the deciders will acknowledge the 2-3 universes reality they currently refuse to acknowledge, while waiting for a miracle as the solution.
 
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Bowlmania

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This article from SI details the "massive challenges" college football faces this Fall. From the article:

"From testing issues to the impossibility of an on-campus protective bubble, from in-season interruptions to the latest quandary—contact tracing and that pesky 14-day quarantine. “It’s very very hard to imagine how this can work.'"
https://www.si.com/college/2020/07/21/college-football-return-coronavirus-contact-tracing
Personally, I think the best option is a conference-only season beginning February 27 and ending in early May. Obviously that's not a perfect solution, and CFB would need some major cooperation from the NFL in rescheduling pro events in the spring and beyond, but this may be the only chance of having college football this academic year.
 
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This article from SI details the "massive challenges" college football faces this Fall. From the article:

"From testing issues to the impossibility of an on-campus protective bubble, from in-season interruptions to the latest quandary—contact tracing and that pesky 14-day quarantine. “It’s very very hard to imagine how this can work.'"
https://www.si.com/college/2020/07/21/college-football-return-coronavirus-contact-tracing
Personally, I think the best option is a conference-only season beginning February 27 and ending in early May. Obviously that's not a perfect solution, and CFB would need some major cooperation from the NFL in rescheduling pro events in the spring and beyond, but this may be the only chance of having college football this academic year.
But what do you with next season's schedule? It doesn't seem realistic to come back after only a four month layoff, although only three months with practicing, to start another season. Or does moving football to spring mean a permanent move that way?
 
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Bowlmania

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But what do you with next season's schedule? It doesn't seem realistic to come back after only a four month layoff, although only three months with practicing, to start another season. Or does moving football to spring mean a permanent move that way?
Yeah, it would probably require an adjustment to the Fall 2021 schedule, but these are extraordinary times.
 

DANC

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Doesn’t the beginning of basketball fight end of fb and bowls/playoffs now?
Anyway you cut it-it’s SH!+!!
And. What’s colder- Ann Arbor on thanksgiving or Feb. 1?
My main question: What generates more revenue. 3-6 games in the fall or 8-10 in the spring? I don’t know myself-asking those that might.
But I am assuming trouble in the fall with a better handle on the virus in the spring
I think the basketball conflict is overblown, too. I doubt there will be attendance at basketball games because they're indoors. Besides, college football is one day a week - Saturdays (for most of the games). Basketball runs 7 days a week.

And you're right - it's just as cold in Michigan in November as it is in February. By March, the coldet of the weather is over.

I'm starting to think Spring football would be a better option. I think teams will be too skitish about playing this Fall. If we cut off training for 6 positive cases, I just don't think schools are psychologically ready for football, even though the mortality rate for that age group is ridiculously low and the majority who do have it are asymptomatice.

We're running out of time.
 
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i'vegotwinners

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Doesn’t the beginning of basketball fight end of fb and bowls/playoffs now?
Anyway you cut it-it’s SH!+!!
And. What’s colder- Ann Arbor on thanksgiving or Feb. 1?
My main question: What generates more revenue. 3-6 games in the fall or 8-10 in the spring? I don’t know myself-asking those that might.
But I am assuming trouble in the fall with a better handle on the virus in the spring
much colder in Feb than Nov in Ann Arbor. (about 13 degrees colder on average).

these conversations are getting entertaining though.

as to,

My main question: What generates more revenue. 3-6 games in the fall or 8-10 in the spring? I don’t know myself-asking those that might.

nobody told me there was going to be math.
 
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Bowlmania

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I don't think weather is much of an issue if the season starts in late February. Yeah, there could be a cold, snowy Saturday in the early season, but they can deal with it. IU schedules baseball games in Bloomington the first week of March, and UM schedules baseball games in Ann Arbor the second week of March. I think the B1G can handle football in late winter.
 
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crossfire74

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NCAA football delays start until first week in February 2021?
It would seem safer, IMO
? Safer: possible vaccine, better knowledge of treatment!
Financial: Would a Delayed full season (or at least conference only) with fans-in -stands,
result in higher revenue than a season that starts then stops, with no fans because of too much risk?
The draft I saw was football would start playing in March and end in May. As far as money goes, having people be able to attend would obviously do the pocketbook good, and you can schedule bball game times to not interfere too much. Alvarez says no football equals 100 million dollar loss. I've heard that playing in fall, with no fans, would equal out to about a 40 million dollar loss potentially.

On a side note, I saw where DePauw University is staggering their semesters. Freshman/Sophmores will be on campus for the fall and then on line in winter. Juniors and Seniors would be on line in Fall and on campus in winter. There conference has also cancelled all fall sports.

So still lots of different routes out there to go. Just depends on what the conference/NCAA decides.
 
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Hoosier009

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NCAA football delays start until first week in February 2021?
It would seem safer, IMO
? Safer: possible vaccine, better knowledge of treatment!
Financial: Would a Delayed full season (or at least conference only) with fans-in -stands,
result in higher revenue than a season that starts then stops, with no fans because of too much risk?
I have heard of this idea floated and feel its a good fall back position if fall season is canceled. Which is a real possibility. I would prefer a mid March kickoff to avoid bitterly cold days. Season could be extended beyond 2nd semester end date through May with playoffs during early June. Looking forward to some tailgating during the Spring.
 

destewart

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Doesn’t the beginning of basketball fight end of fb and bowls/playoffs now?
Anyway you cut it-it’s SH!+!!
And. What’s colder- Ann Arbor on thanksgiving or Feb. 1?
My main question: What generates more revenue. 3-6 games in the fall or 8-10 in the spring? I don’t know myself-asking those that might.
But I am assuming trouble in the fall with a better handle on the virus in the spring
By spring, with no relief, athletic departments will be running on fumes. The financial carnage will be felt for decades and recovery will be in serious doubt.
 

oldcougar77

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Just a few games into the season, MLB has already been forced to cancel some games.

I've lost hope for college football this Fall. It pains me to say that, and I hope I'm wrong.
I tend to agree. I think we're screwed as far as sports go until a vaccine or a quick and effective treatment is available. The resurgance in Europe is discouraging for sure. I don't know if it's attributable to people becoming complacent and less diligent about masks and social distancing, or if this bug is just resilient as hell. Either way, I think football this fall was always a stretch and looks less and less likely each day.
 

Bowlmania

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It's beginning to look like a "bubble" is the only way to go. MLS is doing well in its bubble. NBA seems to be ok, too. Baseball (not in a bubble) is already having problems. College football, unfortunately, can't be played in a bubble.
 
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DANC

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I tend to agree. I think we're screwed as far as sports go until a vaccine or a quick and effective treatment is available. The resurgance in Europe is discouraging for sure. I don't know if it's attributable to people becoming complacent and less diligent about masks and social distancing, or if this bug is just resilient as hell. Either way, I think football this fall was always a stretch and looks less and less likely each day.
And yet, while the number of positive cases have increased for around the last 6 week in Indiana, the mortality rate has been going down.

(check the Metrics By Day)

https://www.coronavirus.in.gov/

Also, please note that over 75% of deaths have been in those 70 and above. 92% in those 60 and over. And that breakdown has been consistent over the length of time the virus has been around).

Whatever the reason, the virus isn't affecting people as seriously as before, either because of better treatment options or perhaps the virus has lost strength.

Based on the statistics, I see no reason why college football can't proceed as scheduled. If old guys like me need to be kept out of the stadium, fine. But life should go on, considering the risk and the effect, both psychologically and economically, on colleges, their sports programs, and fans. Like it or not, sports is an important part of many people's lives and can, in fact, provide great opportunties for those at the lower levels of poverty to improve their lot in life.
 
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Courtsensetwo

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NCAA football delays start until first week in February 2021?
It would seem safer, IMO
? Safer: possible vaccine, better knowledge of treatment!
Financial: Would a Delayed full season (or at least conference only) with fans-in -stands,
result in higher revenue than a season that starts then stops, with no fans because of too much risk?
Brrrrrrrrrrrrrr
 

oldcougar77

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And yet, while the number of positive cases have increased for around the last 6 week in Indiana, the mortality rate has been going down.

(check the Metrics By Day)

https://www.coronavirus.in.gov/

Also, please note that over 75% of deaths have been in those 70 and above. 92% in those 60 and over. And that breakdown has been consistent over the length of time the virus has been around).

Whatever the reason, the virus isn't affecting people as seriously as before, either because of better treatment options or perhaps the virus has lost strength.

Based on the statistics, I see no reason why college football can't proceed as scheduled. If old guys like me need to be kept out of the stadium, fine. But life should go on, considering the risk and the effect, both psychologically and economically, on colleges, their sports programs, and fans. Like it or not, sports is an important part of many people's lives and can, in fact, provide great opportunties for those at the lower levels of poverty to improve their lot in life.
Unfortunately, the issue of playing college sports is much broader than the risk of death. Lots of people who contract this virus experience serious symptoms. A big reason for the mortality rate drop is the better understanding of how to treat hospitalized patients than existed in March and April. The same way battlefield deaths have decreased dramatically with medical advances. That certainly doesn't mean that those who get wounded aren't seriously compromised both in the short and long terms. Another death-mitigating factor is that newer victims tend to be in younger and healthier demographics. They are still sick as hell in some cases. I missed three weeks of basketball season and more than a week of school my freshman year in high school with complications from bronchitis that I foolishly didn't give time to run its course - all because I was determined to get back on the court too soon. It didn't kill me, but it put me on bedrest for ten days. It would have put me in the hospital if my parents hadn't promised the doctor to chain me to the bed if necessary. Imagine if that had been something contagious that I could have transmitted to my teammates.

Outbreaks in any group, even the most healthy, still mean the likelihood of wider spread to high-risk populations. It still means stress on hospitals, clinics, and medical personnel. It still means expansion of the use of already-limited PPE and testing capacity. It means disruption to the academic pursuits of these players. Keep in mind that very few of these kids make a living playing football. The vast majority need to stay on track with classwork and degree schedules.

One of my daughters contracted pnuemonia one semester in college. It played hell with her academics and ended up setting her back a semester because she couldn't physically keep up with the workload. A lot of young people get really nasty symptoms with this, even if they are not at risk of death. The long-term health implications of this virus are still a mystery.

We get way too optimistic about the severity of this thing when we focus on mortality as the sole negative outcome. This isn't the flu. It is much more contagious and it requires a minimum of ten days of isolation even for those with minor (or no) symptoms. As much as I would love for college football to happen this fall, it isn't an essential activity, either for fans or players. It sucks, and hopefully we get a vaccine or effective treatment very soon. In the meantime, I think you have to err on the side of caution.
 

DANC

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Unfortunately, the issue of playing college sports is much broader than the risk of death. Lots of people who contract this virus experience serious symptoms. A big reason for the mortality rate drop is the better understanding of how to treat hospitalized patients than existed in March and April. The same way battlefield deaths have decreased dramatically with medical advances. That certainly doesn't mean that those who get wounded aren't seriously compromised both in the short and long terms. Another death-mitigating factor is that newer victims tend to be in younger and healthier demographics. They are still sick as hell in some cases. I missed three weeks of basketball season and more than a week of school my freshman year in high school with complications from bronchitis that I foolishly didn't give time to run its course - all because I was determined to get back on the court too soon. It didn't kill me, but it put me on bedrest for ten days. It would have put me in the hospital if my parents hadn't promised the doctor to chain me to the bed if necessary. Imagine if that had been something contagious that I could have transmitted to my teammates.

Outbreaks in any group, even the most healthy, still mean the likelihood of wider spread to high-risk populations. It still means stress on hospitals, clinics, and medical personnel. It still means expansion of the use of already-limited PPE and testing capacity. It means disruption to the academic pursuits of these players. Keep in mind that very few of these kids make a living playing football. The vast majority need to stay on track with classwork and degree schedules.

One of my daughters contracted pnuemonia one semester in college. It played hell with her academics and ended up setting her back a semester because she couldn't physically keep up with the workload. A lot of young people get really nasty symptoms with this, even if they are not at risk of death. The long-term health implications of this virus are still a mystery.

We get way too optimistic about the severity of this thing when we focus on mortality as the sole negative outcome. This isn't the flu. It is much more contagious and it requires a minimum of ten days of isolation even for those with minor (or no) symptoms. As much as I would love for college football to happen this fall, it isn't an essential activity, either for fans or players. It sucks, and hopefully we get a vaccine or effective treatment very soon. In the meantime, I think you have to err on the side of caution.
I have had several health issues that laid me low when I was young, includeing several cases of pneumonia in the Army and college and a kidney infection (which put me down for a solid 2 weeks in my Senior year of HS),

I have sinus infections that make me miserable for weeks upon weeks.

There are serious side effects of these types of infections. But we don't stop life because of them.

Most people in that age group don't even know they have it.

The thing most people who are fearful of the virus is the effect the shutdown is having on our economy and the psychologial effect on individuals and families. Crime is up and rising. Domestic abuse is rising. People can't play their bills. While getting the virus may affect some adversely after they have it, the damage the shutdown is doing to the country - and the world - is far worse.

I doubt we have football anyway, but if you're going by 'science' and statistics, there really isn't any reason not to have it, fans in attendance or not.
 
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Bowlmania

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Unfortunately, the issue of playing college sports is much broader than the risk of death. Lots of people who contract this virus experience serious symptoms. A big reason for the mortality rate drop is the better understanding of how to treat hospitalized patients than existed in March and April. The same way battlefield deaths have decreased dramatically with medical advances. That certainly doesn't mean that those who get wounded aren't seriously compromised both in the short and long terms. Another death-mitigating factor is that newer victims tend to be in younger and healthier demographics. They are still sick as hell in some cases. I missed three weeks of basketball season and more than a week of school my freshman year in high school with complications from bronchitis that I foolishly didn't give time to run its course - all because I was determined to get back on the court too soon. It didn't kill me, but it put me on bedrest for ten days. It would have put me in the hospital if my parents hadn't promised the doctor to chain me to the bed if necessary. Imagine if that had been something contagious that I could have transmitted to my teammates.

Outbreaks in any group, even the most healthy, still mean the likelihood of wider spread to high-risk populations. It still means stress on hospitals, clinics, and medical personnel. It still means expansion of the use of already-limited PPE and testing capacity. It means disruption to the academic pursuits of these players. Keep in mind that very few of these kids make a living playing football. The vast majority need to stay on track with classwork and degree schedules.

One of my daughters contracted pnuemonia one semester in college. It played hell with her academics and ended up setting her back a semester because she couldn't physically keep up with the workload. A lot of young people get really nasty symptoms with this, even if they are not at risk of death. The long-term health implications of this virus are still a mystery.

We get way too optimistic about the severity of this thing when we focus on mortality as the sole negative outcome. This isn't the flu. It is much more contagious and it requires a minimum of ten days of isolation even for those with minor (or no) symptoms. As much as I would love for college football to happen this fall, it isn't an essential activity, either for fans or players. It sucks, and hopefully we get a vaccine or effective treatment very soon. In the meantime, I think you have to err on the side of caution.
Great points, and this article underscores some of them.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/aliceg...toms-even-in-young-people-study/#160bae7318e8
 

mcmurtry66

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It's beginning to look like a "bubble" is the only way to go. MLS is doing well in its bubble. NBA seems to be ok, too. Baseball (not in a bubble) is already having problems. College football, unfortunately, can't be played in a bubble.
i'm with you. at this point i see zero chance of a college football season. the virus has now infected 14 marlins' players and they're postponing games.
 
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Chriselli

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Interesting note that a starting pitcher for the Red Sox is suffering from heart implications from having COVID-19. When I was in my 20's, I suffered from viral myocarditis and experienced heart failure and was in an induced coma. Apparently, some form of myocarditis is being seen in 10-20% of COVID patients - per the ESPN article. I can tell you, myocarditis is no joke. I was young and healthy. I didn't die, but I was airlifted to Emory Hospital and will never feel the same about a "cold" again.
 

oldcougar77

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I have had several health issues that laid me low when I was young, includeing several cases of pneumonia in the Army and college and a kidney infection (which put me down for a solid 2 weeks in my Senior year of HS),

I have sinus infections that make me miserable for weeks upon weeks.

There are serious side effects of these types of infections. But we don't stop life because of them.

Most people in that age group don't even know they have it.

The thing most people who are fearful of the virus is the effect the shutdown is having on our economy and the psychologial effect on individuals and families. Crime is up and rising. Domestic abuse is rising. People can't play their bills. While getting the virus may affect some adversely after they have it, the damage the shutdown is doing to the country - and the world - is far worse.

I doubt we have football anyway, but if you're going by 'science' and statistics, there really isn't any reason not to have it, fans in attendance or not.
I don't disagree about the damaging effects of a shutdown. If I were in charge at this stage I would implement severe restrictions on gatherings for the month of August and implement a nation-wide mask and distancing mandate in order to stifle the new outbreaks. Then open schools and businesses on Sept. 1 with mask and distancing mandates in place, asking producers to do all possible to protect workers. Kids have to be educated, the economy has to move and people have to return to work.

I just can't see college sports as essential to the reopening of the economy. I would prefer the government stimulus money be reserved to those who remain unemployed or underemployed due to ongoing impacts ( I agree that the extra $600 should be discontinued) and that the government set aside funds to reimburse colleges and universities for the lost revenue generated by college football.

As far as B1G Ten football, I would move it to the spring with a six-game schedule, all vs. division opponents. The two division winners would then play a conference champinship game. Decide the bowl picture late in the winter after time to review where we are vs. this virus. It would suck to not have a Bucket Game, but realistically, of the 14 teams in the conference only IU and Purdue would miss out on their true rivalry game(s). Split all conference revenue from every source equally among the 14 schools. Just my 2 cents.
 
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DANC

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I don't disagree about the damaging effects of a shutdown. If I were in charge at this stage I would implement severe restrictions on gatherings for the month of August and implement a nation-wide mask and distancing mandate in order to stifle the new outbreaks. Then open schools and businesses on Sept. 1 with mask and distancing mandates in place, asking producers to do all possible to protect workers. Kids have to be educated, the economy has to move and people have to return to work.

I just can't see college sports as essential to the reopening of the economy. I would prefer the government stimulus money be reserved to those who remain unemployed or underemployed due to ongoing impacts ( I agree that the extra $600 should be discontinued) and that the government set aside funds to reimburse colleges and universities for the lost revenue generated by college football.

As far as B1G Ten football, I would move it to the spring with a six-game schedule, all vs. division opponents. The two division winners would then play a conference champinship game. Decide the bowl picture late in the winter after time to review where we are vs. this virus. It would suck to not have a Bucket Game, but realistically, of the 14 teams in the conference only IU and Purdue would miss out on their true rivalry game(s). Split all conference revenue from every source equally among the 14 schools. Just my 2 cents.
Not unreasonable.

On the $600 per week in addition to regular unemployment, I have a 'hilljack' relative who just developed a back problem and got fired and is now collecting both the $600 plus unemployment. Plus the Section 8 housing. Plus the food stamps. Let's just say she is in no hurry to get back to work (which was sporadic anyway, before all this).
 
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Not unreasonable.

On the $600 per week in addition to regular unemployment, I have a 'hilljack' relative who just developed a back problem and got fired and is now collecting both the $600 plus unemployment. Plus the Section 8 housing. Plus the food stamps. Let's just say she is in no hurry to get back to work (which was sporadic anyway, before all this).
The 600 dollars in addition to regular unemployment expired last Saturday and sounds like it will not be renewed.
 
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oldcougar77

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Not unreasonable.

On the $600 per week in addition to regular unemployment, I have a 'hilljack' relative who just developed a back problem and got fired and is now collecting both the $600 plus unemployment. Plus the Section 8 housing. Plus the food stamps. Let's just say she is in no hurry to get back to work (which was sporadic anyway, before all this).
There is no doubt that government "handouts" create opportunity for fraud and there are a lot of despicable people out there taking advantage.

It's also important to remember that there is much good for people in real need in those programs. And the vice isn't limited to the cheating recipients. Last year a medical supply company kept sending unnecessary braces and other appliances to my mother in what was I'm sure a massive medicare fraud scheme. My parents of course returned them, refused to pay their share, and reported the scam to any and every government agency they could get to listen. None of them had any interest in investigating, much to my dad's enormous frustration. He wasn't out anything, but he was beside himself that the US Government seemed to care less that it was being defrauded of tens of thousands of dollars.

Meanwhile, the good people of Ohio have been bilked to the tune of $60 million by their own House Speaker and his political cronies in a public utility scandal. While this doesn't excuse the welfare cheat, it kind of puts in perspective who the taxpayers should really be worried about.

As the comedienne Wanda Sykes once opined, she feared muggers far less than politicians. She said, "a mugger will steal the money you have on you. Politicians will steal what you haven't even earned yet".
 

DANC

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The 600 dollars in addition to regular unemployment expired last Saturday and sounds like it will not be renewed.
It sounds to me like it will be renewed. Possibly a lower amount, but from what I've read, they're definitely getting something.
 
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It sounds to me like it will be renewed. Possibly a lower amount, but from what I've read, they're definitely getting something.
Yes, they will probably will come up with something but it in all likelihood will be far less. The dems want to continue the 600, the rep. want to make it the exact amount you make which would be a nightmare to try to actually implement. Probably will do nothing for a month or more.
 

DANC

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Yes, they will probably will come up with something but it in all likelihood will be far less. The dems want to continue the 600, the rep. want to make it the exact amount you make which would be a nightmare to try to actually implement. Probably will do nothing for a month or more.
Whatever they do will be retroactive.

Never count on the Republicans not to cave when the Democrats start their media campaign against Republican-sponsored legislation.
 

Bligedy

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NCAA football delays start until first week in February 2021?
It would seem safer, IMO
? Safer: possible vaccine, better knowledge of treatment!
Financial: Would a Delayed full season (or at least conference only) with fans-in -stands,
result in higher revenue than a season that starts then stops, with no fans because of too much risk?
What if a vaccine doesn't come?

I personally find spring football to be a goofy idea. Given the COVID statistics for people in the players' demographic, asking them to play 2 seasons in a span of 10 months is almost as dangerous as anything they face with COVID.

Players are skipping bowl games in January as to not risk compromising their draft status. I would imagine a spring football season would be played without most of the probably NFL guys. And the NFL will won't change their schedule for anyone or anything.

As for weather, IU has trouble drawing on a beautiful September day so I can't see them drawing in March or April.....although people might be so starved for live sports by that time that they'll show up. Who knows.

I don't think there are many (any?) good options. But I certainly don't think Spring Football is one of them.
 
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northindyaj

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I personally would love a spring season. If a vaccine happens late this year or early next, it would be a perfect way to get back to some version of normalcy. I also sure as hell want to watch this team as they have a chance to be pretty good
 
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YOTHN

All-Big Ten
Jun 20, 2014
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i'm with you. at this point i see zero chance of a college football season. the virus has now infected 14 marlins' players and they're postponing games.
Major league baseball is postponing games one day at a time. They are set to play tomorrow again. Football is a weekly sport. With testing coming back the same day, they test the entire team, isolate those who are positive and move forward. People keep counting on this vaccine as if its definitely coming and even IF it does, they are additionally assuming it will work well. If we are shutting down life as we know it in the sports world, I would expect it to be shut down a lot longer than just this season. I think its time people got real and understood we are going to be living with this for quite some time. We either learn to live with it or just curl up and hide.
 
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mcmurtry66

All-Big Ten
Mar 14, 2019
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Major league baseball is postponing games one day at a time. They are set to play tomorrow again. Football is a weekly sport. With testing coming back the same day, they test the entire team, isolate those who are positive and move forward. People keep counting on this vaccine as if its definitely coming and even IF it does, they are additionally assuming it will work well. If we are shutting down life as we know it in the sports world, I would expect it to be shut down a lot longer than just this season. I think its time people got real and understood we are going to be living with this for quite some time. We either learn to live with it or just curl up and hide.
i hear ya but those are paid professionals. not amateur students. apples to oranges.
 

YOTHN

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Jun 20, 2014
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i hear ya but those are paid professionals. not amateur students. apples to oranges.
And those professional athletes are more susceptible to this virus than the amateur students. These students are going to school and graduating. Amateur sports isn't going to wait for them. It is clearly up to each individual to decide whether they would like to play or not but I don't see them stopping the options to continue the revenue stream for something that is proving not to be very harmful for people their age. Especially when those kids have the choice to play or not.

Again, we all want normal to be back but its not going to be for quite some time. Everything is going to be a bit clunky compared to normal and will look quite a bit different than we are accustomed to but the world must continue.
 
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mcmurtry66

All-Big Ten
Mar 14, 2019
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And those professional athletes are more susceptible to this virus than the amateur students. These students are going to school and graduating. Amateur sports isn't going to wait for them. It is clearly up to each individual to decide whether they would like to play or not but I don't see them stopping the options to continue the revenue stream for something that is proving not to be very harmful for people their age. Especially when those kids have the choice to play or not.
i just don't see it happening. it's too hard to control college kids. they'll be at house parties etc and then the virus will spread. too much for colleges to deal with imo. plus we don't really know the long term impact on kids of getting infected and they can still infect parents/teachers/gparents/staff etc. it's just not worth the risk for schools to attempt it. and believe me it sucks. i'm a huge sports guy. played d1 in college. it meant more to me than anything.

i think part of it also depends on what's happening in that area. my guess (truly a guess) is that playing in a city/region with few cases is a hell of a lot different than trying to get football going right now at miami, fiu, and fau.
 

YOTHN

All-Big Ten
Jun 20, 2014
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i just don't see it happening. it's too hard to control college kids. they'll be at house parties etc and then the virus will spread. too much for colleges to deal with imo. plus we don't really know the long term impact on kids of getting infected and they can still infect parents/teachers/gparents/staff etc. it's just not worth the risk for schools to attempt it. and believe me it sucks. i'm a huge sports guy. played d1 in college. it meant more to me than anything.

i think part of it also depends on what's happening in that area. my guess (truly a guess) is that playing in a city/region with few cases is a hell of a lot different than trying to get football going right now at miami, fiu, and fau.
I fully understand everyones thoughts and concern for the utmost caution. I just think in the end, those same scenarios you are stating are in place for professional sports as well. Those football players will be no different in those classes with teachers, parents, staff...etc than the other students. If the other student's aren't in school than the fball team will be doing things remotely as well. My point is, we aren't shutting down life as we know it everywhere else, we are just changing how we approach life. The same is going to be said for sports.
 
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