Numbers

MyTeamIsOnTheFloor

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Duckburg

So in the US right now, 1.79 percent of folks getting the Covid die - according to https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/#countries

They don't break it down by any demographics - just raw numbers -

The US "death rate per million" is lower than Czechia, Belgium, Slovenia, the UK, Italy and Portugal. Inneresting.

For Kentucky, we have an "overall" death rate of 1.14%.
For my age group (60 - 69) its higher - 1.8 %

Neither site shows stats for my personal "high risk" groups - but I'm told the numbers for "rheumatoid arthritis" sufferers do not show a higher "catch it" rate than normal, and do not show a higher "hospitalization" or "ICU" or "death" rate - probably because (as I predicted) the meds suppress the immune response and help prevent the "cytokine storm" attack that kills.

Hypertension (even treated) is still bad. But I can't find many numbers.

Also can't find any medical folks who can explain the different outcomes - 1 patient if OK - 1 is a long hauler - 1 is a death - etc. After a year, still nothing predictable.

Kentucky publishes hospitalization numbers.

4.73% of folks who got it were "ever hospitalized"

0.98% of folks went to an ICU

I'm surprised by that since, since Kentucky has a high smoker rate. I figured Kentucky outcomes would be worse than other places, but no.

Most odd - I'll be getting my first vaccination Thursday. It's said to be 94-95% effective at preventing hospitalizations and bad outcomes. So even though it doesn't really improve my math, I feel better about getting out of my house soon. I wonder why?

I also look forward to seeing if the annual mortality numbers will be higher for 2020 with Covid, or if we just traded other deaths for Covid deaths? Or if the numbers shift - for example folks over 80 make up 46.3% of the Covid deaths here. Would 46.3 of the deaths been 80+ folks even if Covid had not hit?

I have no idea - but I'm sure the actuaries will be all over it.
 

UncleMark

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Sep 1, 2001
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I also look forward to seeing if the annual mortality numbers will be higher for 2020 with Covid, or if we just traded other deaths for Covid deaths? Or if the numbers shift - for example folks over 80 make up 46.3% of the Covid deaths here. Would 46.3 of the deaths been 80+ folks even if Covid had not hit?
Numbers are always fun. I like them. But they don't tell the whole story. Regarding your latter point above, even if it was a 1:1 trade, those folks could have died a peaceful death surrounded by their loved ones, not intubated and isolated. The numbers don't take that into account.
 
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i'vegotwinners

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Dec 1, 2006
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So in the US right now, 1.79 percent of folks getting the Covid die - according to https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/#countries

They don't break it down by any demographics - just raw numbers -

The US "death rate per million" is lower than Czechia, Belgium, Slovenia, the UK, Italy and Portugal. Inneresting.

For Kentucky, we have an "overall" death rate of 1.14%.
For my age group (60 - 69) its higher - 1.8 %

Neither site shows stats for my personal "high risk" groups - but I'm told the numbers for "rheumatoid arthritis" sufferers do not show a higher "catch it" rate than normal, and do not show a higher "hospitalization" or "ICU" or "death" rate - probably because (as I predicted) the meds suppress the immune response and help prevent the "cytokine storm" attack that kills.

Hypertension (even treated) is still bad. But I can't find many numbers.

Also can't find any medical folks who can explain the different outcomes - 1 patient if OK - 1 is a long hauler - 1 is a death - etc. After a year, still nothing predictable.

Kentucky publishes hospitalization numbers.

4.73% of folks who got it were "ever hospitalized"

0.98% of folks went to an ICU

I'm surprised by that since, since Kentucky has a high smoker rate. I figured Kentucky outcomes would be worse than other places, but no.

Most odd - I'll be getting my first vaccination Thursday. It's said to be 94-95% effective at preventing hospitalizations and bad outcomes. So even though it doesn't really improve my math, I feel better about getting out of my house soon. I wonder why?

I also look forward to seeing if the annual mortality numbers will be higher for 2020 with Covid, or if we just traded other deaths for Covid deaths? Or if the numbers shift - for example folks over 80 make up 46.3% of the Covid deaths here. Would 46.3 of the deaths been 80+ folks even if Covid had not hit?

I have no idea - but I'm sure the actuaries will be all over it.


without any accurate numbers on the percent of any group who have been infected to date, it's impossible to apply any survival rates once infected, to any group.

that said, while the vaccines give out their efficacy rates, they don't break them down by age group.

being i'm an old fart, it would be nice to know the efficacy of each vaccine for old farts.

telling me the overall efficacy rate of a vaccine, is as meaningless as telling me the overall survival rate absent the vaccine.
 

MyTeamIsOnTheFloor

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Dec 5, 2001
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Duckburg
without any accurate numbers on the percent of any group who have been infected to date, it's impossible to apply any survival rates once infected, to any group.

that said, while the vaccines give out their efficacy rates, they don't break them down by age group.

being i'm an old fart, it would be nice to know the efficacy of each vaccine for old farts.

telling me the overall efficacy rate of a vaccine, is as meaningless as telling me the overall survival rate absent the vaccine.

we will learn all that .... in a couple of years!
 

iuwclurker

All-American
Jul 6, 2015
6,106
2,293
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So in the US right now, 1.79 percent of folks getting the Covid die - according to https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/#countries

They don't break it down by any demographics - just raw numbers -

The US "death rate per million" is lower than Czechia, Belgium, Slovenia, the UK, Italy and Portugal. Inneresting.

For Kentucky, we have an "overall" death rate of 1.14%.
For my age group (60 - 69) its higher - 1.8 %

Neither site shows stats for my personal "high risk" groups - but I'm told the numbers for "rheumatoid arthritis" sufferers do not show a higher "catch it" rate than normal, and do not show a higher "hospitalization" or "ICU" or "death" rate - probably because (as I predicted) the meds suppress the immune response and help prevent the "cytokine storm" attack that kills.

Hypertension (even treated) is still bad. But I can't find many numbers.

Also can't find any medical folks who can explain the different outcomes - 1 patient if OK - 1 is a long hauler - 1 is a death - etc. After a year, still nothing predictable.

Kentucky publishes hospitalization numbers.

4.73% of folks who got it were "ever hospitalized"

0.98% of folks went to an ICU

I'm surprised by that since, since Kentucky has a high smoker rate. I figured Kentucky outcomes would be worse than other places, but no.

Most odd - I'll be getting my first vaccination Thursday. It's said to be 94-95% effective at preventing hospitalizations and bad outcomes. So even though it doesn't really improve my math, I feel better about getting out of my house soon. I wonder why?

I also look forward to seeing if the annual mortality numbers will be higher for 2020 with Covid, or if we just traded other deaths for Covid deaths? Or if the numbers shift - for example folks over 80 make up 46.3% of the Covid deaths here. Would 46.3 of the deaths been 80+ folks even if Covid had not hit?

I have no idea - but I'm sure the actuaries will be all over it.
You’ll be less likely to kill other people so whatever happens, you’ll have a good conscience.
 

HillzHoozier

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Mar 16, 2005
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without any accurate numbers on the percent of any group who have been infected to date, it's impossible to apply any survival rates once infected, to any group.

that said, while the vaccines give out their efficacy rates, they don't break them down by age group.

being i'm an old fart, it would be nice to know the efficacy of each vaccine for old farts.

telling me the overall efficacy rate of a vaccine, is as meaningless as telling me the overall survival rate absent the vaccine.
This is an important point. Although there were no deaths in the vaccine arm of the Moderna trial, there was only one death in the placebo arm. The trial was full of people who dont need a vaccine in the first place.
 

outside shooter

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Oct 23, 2001
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On the subject of NUMBERS....

Considering how all polls show high levels of support for COVID relief among Americans, even among Republicans, I find these numbers a bit disturbing:

qzzr5fmsrik61.jpg
 

mcmurtry66

All-American
Mar 14, 2019
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On the subject of NUMBERS....

Considering how all polls show high levels of support for COVID relief among Americans, even among Republicans, I find these numbers a bit disturbing:

qzzr5fmsrik61.jpg
Lol pretty useless without context. Unemployment until august? Why so long. To reopen schools? Catholic schools never closed. Checks for people who don't need them? Now i know you're as blue as it gets but at some point we're going to hear "sorry folks time to raise your taxes. remember all those relief packages."
 
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Spartans9312

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Nov 11, 2004
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Lol pretty useless without context. Unemployment until august? Why so long. To reopen schools? Catholic schools never closed. Checks for people who don't need them? Now i know you're as blue as it gets but at some point we're going to hear "sorry folks time to raise your taxes. remember all those relief packages."

The headline is from the amazing/unsurprising files
 
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jet812

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Feb 28, 2008
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Lol pretty useless without context. Unemployment until august? Why so long. To reopen schools? Catholic schools never closed. Checks for people who don't need them? Now i know you're as blue as it gets but at some point we're going to hear "sorry folks time to raise your taxes. remember all those relief packages."
Per GOAT we can just print more money...🙄
 

Marvin the Martian

Hall of Famer
Sep 4, 2001
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Viruses mutate when they copy themselves and something in the copy goes wrong. The more virus that exists, the more copying that happens, the more likely mutations are. It is all very simple.

Each mutation might be a mutation that either can reinfect people who have had the disease or can become resistant to the vaccine.

That is why we needed to try and keep spread down. Fewer people with the virus means fewer copies means fewer variants. It also is why we have to run through the finish line. Opening now sounds great, we all want back to normal. But opening now spreads variants that already might be vaccine resistant and increases the likelihood new resistant strains emerge.

There is some clickbait out on Facebook of sports people celebrating their win too soon and losing. Let us not be them. Run through the tape.
 

ulrey

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Feb 8, 2008
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earle Indiana
8,000 illegal immigrants crossed the border this week. That should help with the covid numbers. Thanks Biden
 
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Spartans9312

Senior
Nov 11, 2004
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So in the US right now, 1.79 percent of folks getting the Covid die - according to https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/#countries

They don't break it down by any demographics - just raw numbers -

The US "death rate per million" is lower than Czechia, Belgium, Slovenia, the UK, Italy and Portugal. Inneresting.

For Kentucky, we have an "overall" death rate of 1.14%.
For my age group (60 - 69) its higher - 1.8 %

Neither site shows stats for my personal "high risk" groups - but I'm told the numbers for "rheumatoid arthritis" sufferers do not show a higher "catch it" rate than normal, and do not show a higher "hospitalization" or "ICU" or "death" rate - probably because (as I predicted) the meds suppress the immune response and help prevent the "cytokine storm" attack that kills.

Hypertension (even treated) is still bad. But I can't find many numbers.

Also can't find any medical folks who can explain the different outcomes - 1 patient if OK - 1 is a long hauler - 1 is a death - etc. After a year, still nothing predictable.

Kentucky publishes hospitalization numbers.

4.73% of folks who got it were "ever hospitalized"

0.98% of folks went to an ICU

I'm surprised by that since, since Kentucky has a high smoker rate. I figured Kentucky outcomes would be worse than other places, but no.

Most odd - I'll be getting my first vaccination Thursday. It's said to be 94-95% effective at preventing hospitalizations and bad outcomes. So even though it doesn't really improve my math, I feel better about getting out of my house soon. I wonder why?

I also look forward to seeing if the annual mortality numbers will be higher for 2020 with Covid, or if we just traded other deaths for Covid deaths? Or if the numbers shift - for example folks over 80 make up 46.3% of the Covid deaths here. Would 46.3 of the deaths been 80+ folks even if Covid had not hit?

I have no idea - but I'm sure the actuaries will be all over it.