NCAA Council allowing immediate eligibility- good or bad

bwcoach

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Dec 17, 2012
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The NCAA Council has voted to allow transfers to have immediate eligibility. It will start after it’s voted on April 28. The transfer portal will probably go bonkers now. Will it be a good thing or mess up many schools? So that means it’s possible for players to load up at a different school like the NBA foes. This would be for only the first time a player transfers.
 

YOTHN

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I think it will feel different from what we were used to a decade ago but we've quickly migrated to that type of an environment over the last 2-3 years. Most players suddenly started getting instant eligibility and utilizing the transfer portal more frequently. The bad news is players may leave your school more frequently but the good news is if your team is bad this year, you can realistically be really good next year with the right additions.

Teams are also more likely to lose players at the bottom of the roster who were sort of locked in for 4 years and teams are more likely to have those players transfer to smaller schools, which will free open that scholarship.

For good programs in their sports (IU in basketball and starting to become Football), they will benefit from this. In regards to IU, I think we take more talent from the pool than we will throw into it. This rule will only further separate the major conferences from the mid-majors because those mid-majors will often just become farm systems or feeder schools for the big boys.
 
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All4You

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Mar 12, 2007
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The NCAA Council has voted to allow transfers to have immediate eligibility. It will start after it’s voted on April 28. The transfer portal will probably go bonkers now. Will it be a good thing or mess up many schools? So that means it’s possible for players to load up at a different school like the NBA foes. This would be for only the first time a player transfers.

The portal changed things alot, and first time transfer being immediate eligibility makes it whackier considering (barring certain circumstances) kids only get 4 years eligibility, so this is basically limited free agency by the sounds of it. Not sure I like it, but what I will be interested in seeing is how the scenario you described and this rule jibes with recruiting.
 
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TR32

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Nov 20, 2009
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It's a terrible idea. It puts a thumb in the eye of hard work, perserverence, and picking a school as a good academic fit as the primary reward. It will also allow coaches to "Crean" their team every time they have a bad season. "Hey, go play someplace else, you can start tomorrow".
It might be good for Keion Brooks though. He can go transfer to Gonzaga or Baylor and maybe make a Final Four next year.
 
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i'vegotwinners

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absolutely a good thing for players, and will benefit schools too.

plenty of kids were already transferring anyway, and always have, so for the schools, this means they won't have to eat a scholly for a yr on a kid transferring in.

as for the kids, four yrs goes fast.

best that they get as much as they can out of those limited yrs.

any contract that binds one side and not the other, is unfair by nature.
 
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shooter1977

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Nov 13, 2002
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There is very little, if anything, the NCAA gets right and this is no different. College basketball is becoming an extension of AAU ball.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see an exodus of good coaches retire or head to the pros in the coming years b/c of this rule.
 

i'vegotwinners

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There is very little, if anything, the NCAA gets right and this is no different. College basketball is becoming an extension of AAU ball.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see an exodus of good coaches retire or head to the pros in the coming years b/c of this rule.

well they should have to sit out a yr before heading to the pros, don't you think.

we can't just have coaches changing schools, or going to the pros, without sitting out a yr, as that would just open the floodgates.
 
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oldcougar77

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Apr 21, 2004
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There is very little, if anything, the NCAA gets right and this is no different. College basketball is becoming an extension of AAU ball.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see an exodus of good coaches retire or head to the pros in the coming years b/c of this rule.
The NCAA lost any moral authority it ever had 30+ years ago when it sold its soul for television $. The move to playing conference games every night of the week at all hours of the evening was a clear signal that the organization, conference leadership, and administrators at member schools didn't give a damn about athletes experiencing college life as students. Any claim that some form of payments to players would destroy the sanctity of amateurism or the spirit of "student-athlete" lost all credibility when that transpired.
 

ufo33

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Fred Glass legacy of the IU Student Athlete Bill of Rights is now outdated. Needs amended or dropped so IU is on a level playing field.
 

Harpo Marxist

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One coach said...."we aren't building programs anymore...we are assembly a group who can win right now".....talking about the portal. Throw in immediate eligibility and college basketball as we know it is gone. This is amateur free agency. He went on to say, players on teams are recruiting their next team mate. Coaches don't even have to do that anymore. A four star high schooler is the new two star. Only the very elite will get recruited out of high school to major programs. Why would a program worry about projecting a player's success when they can go to the portal and take a kid who has already played college for a year or two? No need to project.
 

benhyoung14

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Mar 26, 2021
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This is a horrible idea. You will see underrated players 'test the waters' every year when they outperform their recruiting ranking. Cinderella's will become no more because they will jump to top level programs such as IU. The cinderella's might be good for a year but you won't see sustained success such as Butler during the Stevens years. All these kids, even the 3-stars think they're going to be NBA stars, so when they lose time to the 5-stars they will go looking. This is probably better for IU than the mid-majors but if CMW isn't as good as we think he can be, we could see an exodus at some point. Premium coaches won't want to stick around and deal with the continuous recruiting of players and will try their hand in the NBA. The portal should've gone away, not been expanded.
 

jsig

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Apr 8, 2004
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I think the portal is OK though I think a a player should at least be forced to honor his first 2 years to earn that freedom unless there is a hardship scenario or coaching change. Otherwise he'd have to sit a year.
 
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Coach Geez

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Dec 23, 2019
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This is a horrible idea. You will see underrated players 'test the waters' every year when they outperform their recruiting ranking. Cinderella's will become no more because they will jump to top level programs such as IU. The cinderella's might be good for a year but you won't see sustained success such as Butler during the Stevens years. All these kids, even the 3-stars think they're going to be NBA stars, so when they lose time to the 5-stars they will go looking. This is probably better for IU than the mid-majors but if CMW isn't as good as we think he can be, we could see an exodus at some point. Premium coaches won't want to stick around and deal with the continuous recruiting of players and will try their hand in the NBA. The portal should've gone away, not been expanded.
To play devil's advocate, you'll start to see P5 players frustrated with their role or lack of early playing time transfer down a level for more immediate playing time or "to be the guy" role. It definitely favors the bigger schools but its not a lost cause for the smaller schools.

Look at Grand Canyon, they just landed two former top 50 recruits in Aidan Igiehon and Taeshon Cherry looking for more star studded roles.
 
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Do I like it? No. I enjoy watching players grow in their candy stripes and wonder what they will be like.

But the reality is that if the NCAA did not adopt this rule they would likely have forced to. Kids and especially “advocates “ are pushing for more and more and more. This should appease them a while as will “likeness” money. That will keep lawmakers and lawyers at bay a few years. But in time amateur sports in college will be nothing like we old folks are used to.

I think the next change will be allowing players to have agents for advertising contracts who push coaches for playing time and more shots via “transfer blackmail.”

I also think D1 will start to shrink centered around a few major schools and large markets. In twenty years the mid majors will be the only real amateurs in a new division or organization.
 

i'vegotwinners

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Dec 1, 2006
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Do I like it? No. I enjoy watching players grow in their candy stripes and wonder what they will be like.

But the reality is that if the NCAA did not adopt this rule they would likely have forced to. Kids and especially “advocates “ are pushing for more and more and more. This should appease them a while as will “likeness” money. That will keep lawmakers and lawyers at bay a few years. But in time amateur sports in college will be nothing like we old folks are used to.

I think the next change will be allowing players to have agents for advertising contracts who push coaches for playing time and more shots via “transfer blackmail.”

I also think D1 will start to shrink centered around a few major schools and large markets. In twenty years the mid majors will be the only real amateurs in a new division or organization.


problem is, society is only going to put up for so long with the idea than it's ok for college sports to remain amateur for the kids, while the grown ups and schools go full blown capitalism.

Saban makes over $27,000 a day, 7 days a week, 52 wks a yr.

Archie just got $10,000,000 to go away.

the best college player in the country can't get a free cheeseburger at McDonald's without putting his eligibility in jeopardy.

this stampede towards college sports going pro wasn't started by the kids, but rather was initiated by the adults for whom no amount was ever enough.

the capitalism algorithm is calling the shots, has no off switch, and no one at any school, or any regulatory agency like the NCAA or the conferences, has the authority or power or ability to over ride the algorithm.

if CMW and CTA were making $95,000 a yr, the assistants $55,000, and your cable bill didn't have a $15-$20 mo, (or more), college sports charge that every subscriber is mandated to pay even if they never watch college sports, we wouldn't be having this conversation.

and no, coaches wouldn't leave coaching.

there would still be way more very qualified applicants for every coaching job there is today, than there are college coaching jobs.

and 99% of those lucky enough to have those jobs at those salaries would still be thrilled to have them, they would still be great sought after jobs, and schools would have no problem filling vacancies with great individuals.

the NCAA could set coaching salaries and tv rights standards just like they do for what the players can and can't receive, and just like pro sports have salary caps, being that sports are basically exempt from all anti trust/anti competitive business practice laws.

and schools would still have plenty of money for sports, even non revenue sports, just like they did before the capitalism algorithm took over.

if you don't like the idea of coaches and schools being so constrained, then don't gripe that the players want in on the action.
 
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Birnk403

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problem is, society is only going to put up for so long with the idea than it's ok for college sports to remain amateur for the kids, while the grown ups and schools go full blown capitalism.

Saban makes over $27,000 a day, 7 days a week, 52 wks a yr.

Archie just got $10,000,000 to go away.

the best college player in the country can't get a free cheeseburger at McDonald's without putting his eligibility in jeopardy.

this stampede towards college sports going pro wasn't started by the kids, but rather was initiated by the adults for whom no amount was ever enough.

the capitalism algorithm is calling the shots, has no off switch, and no one at any school, or any regulatory agency like the NCAA or the conferences, has the authority or power or ability to over ride the algorithm.

if CMW and CTA were making $95,000 a yr, the assistants $55,000, and your cable bill didn't have a $15-$20 mo, (or more), college sports charge that every subscriber is mandated to pay even if they never watch college sports, we wouldn't be having this conversation.

and no, coaches wouldn't leave coaching.

there would still be way more very qualified applicants for every coaching job there is today, than there are college coaching jobs.

and 99% of those lucky enough to have those jobs at those salaries would still be thrilled to have them, they would still be great sought after jobs, and schools would have no problem filling vacancies with great individuals.

the NCAA could set coaching salaries and tv rights standards just like they do for what the players can and can't receive, and just like pro sports have salary caps, being that sports are basically exempt from all anti trust/anti competitive business practice laws.

and schools would still have plenty of money for sports, even non revenue sports, just like they did before the capitalism algorithm took over.

if you don't like the idea of coaches and schools being so constrained, then don't gripe that the players want in on the action.
But you wouldn’t be watching games much on television or attending them in anything remotely as nice as Memorial Stadium or Assembly Hall. You’d get a dialed down experience across the board in every conceivable way, and you’d have little in the way of “Olympic” sports as a companion to MBB and FB. Sorry, but your complete lack of understanding here leads you to a nirvana that doesn’t not and could not exist.
 

ThreeToMakeTwo

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Oct 2, 2001
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I believe within five years The Power 5 conferences will separate from the NCAA and start their own gig. They’ll pick up the bigger schools like Gonzaga and others and leave Mark Emmert behind in the dust.
 

i'vegotwinners

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But you wouldn’t be watching games much on television or attending them in anything remotely as nice as Memorial Stadium or Assembly Hall. You’d get a dialed down experience across the board in every conceivable way, and you’d have little in the way of “Olympic” sports as a companion to MBB and FB. Sorry, but your complete lack of understanding here leads you to a nirvana that doesn’t not and could not exist.


5543864653_5ac1097dce_b.jpg



Doc Councilman, Hobie Billingsley, Sam Bell, and Jerry Yeagley, all send their regards.

as do Mike Troy, Mark Spitz, Fred Wilt, Jack Nicklaus, and Jesse Owens.

sorry guy, but you might want to dial back on the hyperbole.

Memorial Stadium was built in the late 1950s, (opened in 1960) and SSAH in the late 60s early 70s.

tv money was a couple cents on the dollar compared to today, football tickets were maybe $5, and tuition was a couple hundred a semester.

and while most IU bball games were televised, the only reason every IU football game wasn't, is because the NCAA wouldn't allow it, and no other reason.

the only reason all the games weren't televised nationally rather than just regionally, is due to channel capacity then, and had zero to do with money.

and yet schools were just fine on money, sports were every bit as big as today, and IU had wrestling and track and swimming/diving and tennis and cross country and gymnastics and golf and baseball with great facilities.

so exactly zero you said is even remotely correct, and all i said is totally true.
 
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Birnk403

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sorry guy, but you might want to dial back on the hyperbole.

Memorial Stadium was built in the late 1950s, (opened in 1960) and SSAH in the late 60s early 70s.

tv money was a couple cents on the dollar compared to today, football tickets were maybe $5, and tuition was a couple hundred a semester.

and while most IU bball games were televised, the only reason every IU football game wasn't, is because the NCAA wouldn't allow it, and no other reason.

the only reason all the games weren't televised nationally rather than just regionally, is due to channel capacity then, and had zero to do with money.

and yet schools were just fine on money, sports were every bit as big as today, and IU had wrestling and track and swimming/diving and tennis and cross country and gymnastics and golf and baseball with great facilities.

so exactly zero you said is even remotely correct, and all i said is totally true.
Again, you have no earthly idea what you’re talking about here. The upgrades and refinements to both main sports facilities would’ve never occurred in the fairy tale world you’ve concocted. Scholarships wouldn’t and couldn’t be financed, and most sports would go away. It’s like the loons who think the Big Ten Network didn’t funnel vast amounts of funding to conference schools. They, like you, have no concept of the financial reality of college athletics.
 

i'vegotwinners

Hall of Famer
Dec 1, 2006
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Again, you have no earthly idea what you’re talking about here. The upgrades and refinements to both main sports facilities would’ve never occurred in the fairy tale world you’ve concocted. Scholarships wouldn’t and couldn’t be financed, and most sports would go away. It’s like the loons who think the Big Ten Network didn’t funnel vast amounts of funding to conference schools. They, like you, have no concept of the financial reality of college athletics.

lmao,

you forgot about the Jewish space lasers.
 

i'vegotwinners

Hall of Famer
Dec 1, 2006
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No, I’m just dealing in facts. You, on the other hand . . .


facts

Memorial Stadium was built in the late 1950s, (opened in 1960) and SSAH in the late 60s early 70s.

tv money was a couple cents on the dollar compared to today, football tickets were maybe $5, and tuition was a couple hundred a semester.

and while most IU bball games were televised, the only reason every IU football game wasn't, is because the NCAA wouldn't allow it, and no other reason.

the only reason all the games weren't televised nationally rather than just regionally, is due to channel capacity then, and had zero to do with money.

and yet schools were just fine on money, sports were every bit as big as today, and IU had wrestling and track and swimming/diving and tennis and cross country and gymnastics and golf and baseball with great facilities.

again, all facts.

and again, Doc Councilman, Hobie Billingsley, Sam Bell, and Jerry Yeagley, all send their regards.

as do Mike Troy, Mark Spitz, Fred Wilt, Jack Nicklaus, Jesse Owens, and a zillion others.
 

Birnk403

All-American
Nov 17, 2019
5,451
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facts

Memorial Stadium was built in the late 1950s, (opened in 1960) and SSAH in the late 60s early 70s.

tv money was a couple cents on the dollar compared to today, football tickets were maybe $5, and tuition was a couple hundred a semester.

and while most IU bball games were televised, the only reason every IU football game wasn't, is because the NCAA wouldn't allow it, and no other reason.

the only reason all the games weren't televised nationally rather than just regionally, is due to channel capacity then, and had zero to do with money.

and yet schools were just fine on money, sports were every bit as big as today, and IU had wrestling and track and swimming/diving and tennis and cross country and gymnastics and golf and baseball with great facilities.

again, all facts.

and again, Doc Councilman, Hobie Billingsley, Sam Bell, and Jerry Yeagley, all send their regards.

as do Mike Troy, Mark Spitz, Fred Wilt, Jack Nicklaus, Jesse Owens, and a zillion others.
Once again, you’re living 50 and 60 years in the past, and none of it is relevant to today’s college sports reality. You literally have no idea what you’re talking about on this stuff. None.
 

Crossblock

Junior
Jan 8, 2019
1,391
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I think this will balance out over a period of years. The message the Players should be getting is if you transfer, you better make the right decision the first time through. Just because a Player's name is in the Portal doesn't mean anybody needs to take him. If I were Coaching, I would be cautious about a Player who is looking to transfer a 2nd time in a 2 or 4 year period. There are a group of Players who won't be happy anywhere unless everything goes as they expected it to.

If I am a Coach, and I have the choice of 1st time transfer who is immediately eligible with two years of eligibility left, or a 2nd time transfer who has to sit out a year with only one year left, I'm taking the first time transfer because I get a bigger bang for the Buck. The other issue is as a Coach, what do you do with a Player who enters the Portal. Do you bury the kid on the Bench to send a message to everybody? Or do you just refuse to re recruit the Kid and let him go thinking this might be addition by subtraction?
 

Columbus-Boiler

Sophomore
Jun 6, 2001
726
710
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It's bad for the fans, at least the ones who loved college basketball in it's heyday. Sure you want your current roster to win, whoever it is, but watching players grow and develop bonded fan and player.

It's going to be a mixed bag for the students. Some will move on and be more successful, some will fail miserably at the cost of their degree. Transferring may be simple now for a player, but it will never help the player as a student. Credits and progress don't translate universally from school to school.

I think HS recruits will suffer the most. Teams will leave scholarships open for transfers and smaller schools will become the "proving grounds/minor leagues" for 3 star types. In football recruiting classes will shrink even more, with 15 or so replacing 20-25 as the "norm" for recruiting class size.

As with any change, the programs who adapt quickest and best to the new normal will succeed.
 
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VanPastorMan

Hall of Famer
Mar 21, 2002
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Central Pennsylvania Via Washington Indiana
The NCAA Council has voted to allow transfers to have immediate eligibility. It will start after it’s voted on April 28. The transfer portal will probably go bonkers now. Will it be a good thing or mess up many schools? So that means it’s possible for players to load up at a different school like the NBA foes. This would be for only the first time a player transfers.
Should we allow schools to cut a kid without any repercussions? It should go both ways if we allow students just decide to leave. In my mind this is a terrible rule change. It will cause chaos with programs. It will rev up cheating because I guess you can recruit a kid as he is going through the hand shake line. Post covid of course.
 

Birnk403

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Should we allow schools to cut a kid without any repercussions? It should go both ways if we allow students just decide to leave. In my mind this is a terrible rule change. It will cause chaos with programs. It will rev up cheating because I guess you can recruit a kid as he is going through the hand shake line. Post covid of course.
Schools can cut kids without “repercussions“. That’s been the case for many years.
 

Aloha Hoosier

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Aug 30, 2001
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problem is, society is only going to put up for so long with the idea than it's ok for college sports to remain amateur for the kids, while the grown ups and schools go full blown capitalism.

Saban makes over $27,000 a day, 7 days a week, 52 wks a yr.

Archie just got $10,000,000 to go away.

the best college player in the country can't get a free cheeseburger at McDonald's without putting his eligibility in jeopardy.

this stampede towards college sports going pro wasn't started by the kids, but rather was initiated by the adults for whom no amount was ever enough.

the capitalism algorithm is calling the shots, has no off switch, and no one at any school, or any regulatory agency like the NCAA or the conferences, has the authority or power or ability to over ride the algorithm.

if CMW and CTA were making $95,000 a yr, the assistants $55,000, and your cable bill didn't have a $15-$20 mo, (or more), college sports charge that every subscriber is mandated to pay even if they never watch college sports, we wouldn't be having this conversation.

and no, coaches wouldn't leave coaching.

there would still be way more very qualified applicants for every coaching job there is today, than there are college coaching jobs.

and 99% of those lucky enough to have those jobs at those salaries would still be thrilled to have them, they would still be great sought after jobs, and schools would have no problem filling vacancies with great individuals.

the NCAA could set coaching salaries and tv rights standards just like they do for what the players can and can't receive, and just like pro sports have salary caps, being that sports are basically exempt from all anti trust/anti competitive business practice laws.

and schools would still have plenty of money for sports, even non revenue sports, just like they did before the capitalism algorithm took over.

if you don't like the idea of coaches and schools being so constrained, then don't gripe that the players want in on the action.
What?
 
Apr 17, 2015
26
28
13
Indiana
problem is, society is only going to put up for so long with the idea than it's ok for college sports to remain amateur for the kids, while the grown ups and schools go full blown capitalism.

Saban makes over $27,000 a day, 7 days a week, 52 wks a yr.

Archie just got $10,000,000 to go away.

the best college player in the country can't get a free cheeseburger at McDonald's without putting his eligibility in jeopardy.

this stampede towards college sports going pro wasn't started by the kids, but rather was initiated by the adults for whom no amount was ever enough.

the capitalism algorithm is calling the shots, has no off switch, and no one at any school, or any regulatory agency like the NCAA or the conferences, has the authority or power or ability to over ride the algorithm.

if CMW and CTA were making $95,000 a yr, the assistants $55,000, and your cable bill didn't have a $15-$20 mo, (or more), college sports charge that every subscriber is mandated to pay even if they never watch college sports, we wouldn't be having this conversation.

and no, coaches wouldn't leave coaching.

there would still be way more very qualified applicants for every coaching job there is today, than there are college coaching jobs.

and 99% of those lucky enough to have those jobs at those salaries would still be thrilled to have them, they would still be great sought after jobs, and schools would have no problem filling vacancies with great individuals.

the NCAA could set coaching salaries and tv rights standards just like they do for what the players can and can't receive, and just like pro sports have salary caps, being that sports are basically exempt from all anti trust/anti competitive business practice laws.

and schools would still have plenty of money for sports, even non revenue sports, just like they did before the capitalism algorithm took over.

if you don't like the idea of coaches and schools being so constrained, then don't gripe that the players want in on the action.
I have no issue with anyone getting paid for what they do. But to call it college sports is a misnomer if players are paid big dollars and agents start negotiating how much PT they get and how much the offense flows thru them. And you know that will come with players being paid even for their name rights
Just call it what it is when kids (or agents) begin negotiating deals. It will be a professional sport and I for one will no longer be interested in how my school or my state school does.
I know I am old, but I liked it better when all schools recruited mostly regional kids. It was the same sort of local pride that made thousands come out for IHSAA games.

If others watch NCAA basketball when it becomes a pro sport and they watch enough to bring in the money they need then good for them. I don’t watch soccer and I don’t watch the WNBA but they are doing fine without me. I don’t begrudge pro soccer players their money nor fans their loyalty. I just don’t personally contribute.
 
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Champs1976

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May 18, 2020
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One thing about the rule change we need to keep in mind is that the student athlete can transfer once with no waiting period. We have seen many examples in football where waivers were given when playing time was absent or very little. Yes, there will be an impact, but I doubt it will be a wild west type free for all. Coaches will be forced to stay close to there players to understand what they will be doing for the next season. Players will be able to get out of systems they don't like or ineffective coaching. Programs that have coaches that develop players will be in high demand. Someone like Woodson, theoretically, may have much more value in an era of no waiting period transfers. We'll see.
 

elijawon

Sophomore
May 20, 2009
839
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Schools can cut kids without “repercussions“. That’s been the case for many years.
Yes, this has been going on for years. I watched an old movie on VHS the other day called One on One, made in the 70's, and addressed this issue. Regarding your other responses to the capitalism algorithm, I do understand what both of you are debating. I just feel like the college market, along with about every other market, is a bubble about ready to burst. The basic college product of MBB just isn't near as exciting or demanding as it was in the past. Ratings can be manipulated by the "closeness" of the game, but I think in general it has been declining. To keep up with the trend, it costs the consumers "fans, students, Alumni" more to keep it going. At what point is it just not worth it anymore. I was a huge Pacers fan until that night the players got in a fight with the fans. I have not watched a Pacers game nor bought merch since. At what point is college basketball not worth the investment to you? 75 bucks a game ticket, 200 bucks a month cable bill? The existing fans will have to cover the tab of the ones that left.
 
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