IUFB and the flu of 1918

Discussion in 'IU Football Board' started by snowling, Mar 27, 2020.

  1. 76-1

    76-1 All-American
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  2. DANC

    DANC All-American
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    My grandfather had it and, while it didn't kill him, it weakened him. His doctor told him to move to a warmer climate, so he and my grandmother packed up their newborn baby - my uncle -and moved to Alberta, Canada, outside Calgary. They were farmers here in Indiana, east of Lafayette, and bought cheap land up there for wheat farming. My mom was born up there in 1929. They lived there from 1919 until 1937, when they moved back, bought some land, and farmed in the same area around Lafayette.

    So, while the Spanish flu didn't kill any relatives that I know of, it had a profound effect on my family.

    Where in France was your grandfather? Was he in the Army or Marines? I had a great uncle who served over there in WWI. He made it home and had 5 sons in WWII, one of whom died over Japan. He was a tailgunner.
     
  3. 76-1

    76-1 All-American
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    Army.

    I'm unsure of the details, I do know he was wounded early on, spent a great deal of time in a hospital in France and caught the Flu on the way home (troopship)...

    Dad was a WW2 Marine...

    Very proud of both of them...
     
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  4. DANC

    DANC All-American
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    As well you should be.

    My dad was in the Army in Korea, 1951-1953. What made the most impression on him was the starving children who used to hand around US dumps, looking for food. That haunted him all his life.
     
  5. 76-1

    76-1 All-American
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    Pretty grim stuff. The horrible effects of warfare on the civilian population is always under reported and under appreciated.
     
  6. red hornet

    red hornet Freshman
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    Right, "The Horrors of War" are devastating
     
  7. UncleMark

    UncleMark Hall of Famer
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    Exactly the same for my dad. He seriously tried to bring his "camp boy" home with him, but the Army thwarted him at every turn. At least that's the family story.
     
  8. 82hoosier

    82hoosier All-American
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    After the war my father was stationed in the Philippines on a ship. He said it was very depressing in that a lot of the people lived in caves. And they were prevented by the US government from hiring anybody to do any manual labor like cleaning cabins. So to circumvent that issue they would hire a family to come in and clean everything on the interior for no money. But they made sure there was always some really nice stuff going out with the garbage
     
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  9. vesuvius13

    vesuvius13 All-Big Ten
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    To put things in perspective the Spanish flu killed over 500,000 US citizens out of 105 million. If this virus would kill as many today, we would have close to 2 million deaths. Think of society today, if we had that many deaths without enough people to bury all of them like they had in 1918, October with 170,000 deaths [it would be 500,000 today].
     
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  10. DANC

    DANC All-American
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    Yeah, my dad had some pictures with the Korean boy that he knew. I guess he was kind of the company mascot.

    When we didn't clean our plates, we got reminded of the Korean kids that hung around the garbage dumps, looking for food. We weren't allowed to waste anthing.
     

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