IU 'all-in" on player NIL

jimmygoiu

All-American
Sep 5, 2001
6,766
2,797
113
Bloomington, Indiana – Indiana University Athletics has announced the formation of a first-of-its-kind Name, Image and Likeness Task Force, further solidifying its position as a leader in a new and burgeoning area of intercollegiate athletics.

Co-chaired by IU Senior Associate Athletic Director for Sport Administration Becky Pany and Senior Associate Athletic Director for Strategic Communications/Director of the Cuban Center Jeremy Gray, the Indiana University Athletics NIL Task Force will provide oversight and leadership in developing the core principles and direction for IU Athletics’ effort to support its students in understanding, assessing and capitalizing in NIL opportunities. The 14-member Task Force includes representatives from a wide range of backgrounds on campus, and will provide oversight over an area that will be an ongoing, functioning part of the IU Athletic Department.

Other members of the Task Force include:

Tom Ostrom, Associate Head Coach, Men’s Basketball
Mike Hart, Associate Head Coach, Football
Ashley Williams, Assistant Coach, Women’s Basketball
Kevin Robson, Assistant Coach, Men’s Soccer
Emily Eaton, Assistant Coach, Swimming
Lo Price, Senior Associate Athletic Director for Academic Services
Kristin Borrelli, Senior Associate Athletic Director for Compliance Services
Tyler Harris, Assistant Athletic Director, Compliance Services
Beau Bauer, Director of Development, Major Gifts, Varsity Club
Lynnea Phillips, Assistant Director of Digital and Social Media
Ash Soni, Executive Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Kelley School
Dr. Galen Clavio, Associate Professor, Director of the National Sports Journalism Center, IU Media School

“NIL is an important part of what IU Athletics will do in support of our students for years to come, and we plan to be a leader in this area,” said IU Vice President and Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Scott Dolson. “In addition to the contributions of our staff, I’m appreciative that Ash Soni and Galen Clavio have agreed to be a part of our task force. They bring not only their enormous talents to our team, but also those of their students at the highly-regarded Kelley School and The Media School, creating a tremendous partnership that will benefit everyone involved.”

NIL has been often talked about issue in intercollegiate athletics in recent years, and it moved to the forefront in April when the NCAA Board of Governors recommended an update to its rules that had long prohibited student-athletes from being compensated for their own name, image and likeness. Following the board’s recommendation, each of the NCAA’s three divisions are expected to adopt new name, image and likeness legislation by January 2021. Those rules will then go into effect at the start of the 2021-22 academic year.

That new NIL legislation is expected to allow student-athletes to be compensated in a variety of areas, including third-party endorsements both related to and separate from athletics; personal appearances; businesses they have started; and social media.

“As many of our graduates know, personal brand building is an important component of the Kelley School experience and we are pleased to share our experience to helping IU student athletes successfully present themselves off the field or court,” said Soni, who also serves as the SungKyunKwan Professor. “We teach students how to define themselves, present their values and develop skills needed for their professional lives. Our students, who often mentor each other, will benefit from working with those they usually only cheer for from the sidelines.”

“NIL is an exciting and mutually beneficial partnership area for Indiana Athletics and the Media School,” said Clavio. “As NIL rights for college athletes expand, giving students the tools to effectively manage and leverage media will be a key element of the process.”

Today’s news comes on the heels of the announcement earlier this month of Indiana University Athletics’ three-year partnership with NIL industry leader Opendorse. Opendorse has been maximizing endorsement value for thousands of professional athletes since 2012, and established its Opendorse Ready program to apply its proven social media solutions to prepare student-athletes for coming changes in Name, Image and Likeness rights.



Move over UK and Duke, IU is going to max player earnings legally!
 
Mar 14, 2003
2,316
3,020
113
but can we shoot 70% from the FT line as a team? And maybe not be near the bottom of 3pt shooting in the conference? really that's what I'm most concerned about.

as someone who is presently paying out-of-state tuition for a full-time student in Bloomington, I have little sympathy for kids getting free rides, free tudors, meals, free shoes...and claiming they are being 'exploited'. I'm sure some may differ in their opinion, and that is their right to do so. But these kids are being 'compensated' to the tune of six digits over the course of a 4 yr college career. Hardly what I consider exploitation.

On a lighter note...without sports to occupy my time this summer, I've caught a shitton of smallmouth bass.
 

RickyRoe

Sophomore
Nov 12, 2008
712
188
43
but can we shoot 70% from the FT line as a team? And maybe not be near the bottom of 3pt shooting in the conference? really that's what I'm most concerned about.

as someone who is presently paying out-of-state tuition for a full-time student in Bloomington, I have little sympathy for kids getting free rides, free tudors, meals, free shoes...and claiming they are being 'exploited'. I'm sure some may differ in their opinion, and that is their right to do so. But these kids are being 'compensated' to the tune of six digits over the course of a 4 yr college career. Hardly what I consider exploitation.

On a lighter note...without sports to occupy my time this summer, I've caught a shitton of smallmouth bass.


So what you're saying is that both your kids and IU student athletes get free tuition, but your kids don't have to work what amounts to more than a full-time job for no pay and they don't make the school millions of dollars each year? Must be nice for your kids.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SIhoosier26
Mar 14, 2003
2,316
3,020
113
So what you're saying is that both your kids and IU student athletes get free tuition, but your kids don't have to work what amounts to more than a full-time job for no pay and they don't make the school millions of dollars each year? Must be nice for your kids.
huh? How did you get that from what I said.

I never said my kid gets free tuition. We're paying a small fortune for a 4 yr degree.

The student athletes are getting reimbursed for their efforts. To the tune of $100K plus for tuition, room & board, and a bachelors degree. Plus free tutoring, free access to the finest fitness rooms in the nation, personal trainers, dietary specialists and cooks. And much more. Seems like we always glaze over this little detail in the argument.

If you want fair...pay the players union wages for the hours they 'work' as athletes. But then, make them pay their way through college like everyone else. See how long that lasts.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rikki-tikka-tava

RickyRoe

Sophomore
Nov 12, 2008
712
188
43
Yeah, that's why I thought this year's class was a little strange, as we really to me needed at least 1 frontcourt guy. Maybe we just weren't close with anyone AM really liked but it seemed odd to me to take Leal and Galloway as our first 2 commits. Seemed to me it should have been 1 or the other and then a post, especially with Franklin from last year.
huh? How did you get that from what I said.

I never said my kid gets free tuition. We're paying a small fortune for a 4 yr degree.

The student athletes are getting reimbursed for their efforts. To the tune of $100K plus for tuition, room & board, and a bachelors degree. Plus free tutoring, free access to the finest fitness rooms in the nation, personal trainers, dietary specialists and cooks. And much more. Seems like we always glaze over this little detail in the argument.

If you want fair...pay the players union wages for the hours they 'work' as athletes. But then, make them pay their way through college like everyone else. See how long that lasts.


You just said that you were paying your kid's tuition, so therefore he's getting free tuition without making the university millions. As far as "union wages" goes, any decent union would have them making enough to cover the tuition and much more given how valuable they are to the school, so I'm perfectly fine with them paying their own tuition as long as they're paid what they're worth.

I have many friends whose companies have paid for their MBAs or other graduate degrees. Not one of those companies said "well, you're getting free tuition so we aren't going to pay you a salary".
 

Brockway

Junior
Jan 27, 2012
1,987
1,437
113
It's nice that IU is supposedly on the leading edge of this, but it won't be an advantage for long with most of the elite recruits. Every school across the land has started or will soon be starting a similar effort.
IU will still have an advantage over schools with a lower profile. Opportunities for a IU BBaller with be greater than say an Xavier BBaller or even a Purdue BBaller, but this advantage will level out quickly with the other major programs that we all want to compete with.
 
Mar 14, 2003
2,316
3,020
113
You just said that you were paying your kid's tuition, so therefore he's getting free tuition without making the university millions. As far as "union wages" goes, any decent union would have them making enough to cover the tuition and much more given how valuable they are to the school, so I'm perfectly fine with them paying their own tuition as long as they're paid what they're worth.

I have many friends whose companies have paid for their MBAs or other graduate degrees. Not one of those companies said "well, you're getting free tuition so we aren't going to pay you a salary".
he's paying us back, if you need to get that personal about it. Very few kids qualify for loans of that size without a parent co-signing. It's still coming from our family, not paid for by the university.

Companies do pay for some employees' MBAs/CPA's, but usually you have to sign up for a 3-5 yr commitment to stay with the company upon graduation. The company is making an investment in you. You usually can't just take your free advanced degree and then run to the highest bidder.

You might be fine with the athletes paying their own way if they get paid...but I bet they wouldn't feel the same way. The math doesn't add up.

Average Union wage: approx $20/hr (www.bls.gov)
Max hours a player can practice a week: 20 hour

Avg gross monthly pay (pre-tax): $1,720 (per month)

Do the math. The kid wouldn't make though the first semester. Our son would have to 'earn' more than $150/hour (based on 20 hrs/week) to even come close to paying his own way. Find me a 'decent union' job paying that rate.

Compare that to the cost of a 4 yr degree that these players are getting for free. I think they are still getting the better financial deal. By far.

Honestly, this slides into a different topic....the ridiculous rise in college tuition costs over the past 20 yrs. Because of the massive cost increase in tuition, I think you and many are grossly undervaluing what the universities are giving away to these athletes . And let's be specific- this is mostly the basketball players, most of the football players, the studs on the baseball teams. Many would be surprised that most big schools still only have 12-15 full rides to spread out on a NCAA baseball roster that carries 25+ kids. The top players get full rides, but most others get partials at best. Most baseball kids never see full rides.

I guess I'm old...I miss the days when kids came to play for the fans and the name on the front of the jersey. But I get it....its c/y 2020, everyone's a social media influencer, everyone tweets their favorite color and politics, everyone has their hands out now, looking for their 'fair' cut. Too bad, because amateur sports will never be the same.
 

jimmygoiu

All-American
Sep 5, 2001
6,766
2,797
113
huh? How did you get that from what I said.

I never said my kid gets free tuition. We're paying a small fortune for a 4 yr degree.

The student athletes are getting reimbursed for their efforts. To the tune of $100K plus for tuition, room & board, and a bachelors degree. Plus free tutoring, free access to the finest fitness rooms in the nation, personal trainers, dietary specialists and cooks. And much more. Seems like we always glaze over this little detail in the argument.

If you want fair...pay the players union wages for the hours they 'work' as athletes. But then, make them pay their way through college like everyone else. See how long that lasts.

Union wages- if IU paid the men's basketball players commensurate with the revenues that they generate, an IU player would earn MORE than $100k per YEAR. IU athletics has it made with the situation that it is currently in. $100k for four years, and reaping in millions per player over those same four years.
 
Mar 14, 2003
2,316
3,020
113
Union wages- if IU paid the men's basketball players commensurate with the revenues that they generate, an IU player would earn MORE than $100k per YEAR. IU athletics has it made with the situation that it is currently in. $100k for four years, and reaping in millions per player over those same four years.
well, then as I said...if the players want the universities to set up a profit sharing program, then recruits would now be lured to the most profitable universities. So you'll see tix prices increase, to increase profits and lure the best recruits. And as I eluded to in the last paragraph of my previous post.....'amateur' college basketball, as we have known it for 100 yrs...is over.

btw those millions that the fball and bball program bring in fund the other sports. Look what just happened in Iowa...no football, so swimming and other sports are now dead for the year. A lot of NCAA teams in other sports are going to cancel their seasons this year, not directly because of COVID numbers, but because the fball gravy train stopped the cash flowing down to other sports.