First they came . . . .

CO. Hoosier

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Martin Niemoller spoke the “First they came” words in post WWII Germany as an explanation of how the horrors of Nazism could take hold in a democratic and largely religious country. He used the frog in the pot argument to explain how bad things happen in small increments until the bad thing is large and uncontrollable.

I’m combining the Andrew Sullivan and Thousand Cuts threads here.

The founding fathers bequeathed us a system of governance and a resulting economic and social structure that was largely based on distrust of power and authority. Our federal government had a robust system of separation of powers and of checks and balances. The federal government was based on federalism where the states, using their own unique and processes ran their own affairs, selected their own leaders and their own representatives to congress. Education, business, media, entertainment, religion, and more were sources of independent and maybe even competing roles in various functions. The Europeans gave us an entrenched system of slavery and servitude that was almost exclusively race based. We also were faced with conflict and questions about native people caused by the inevitable and unstoppable rush of settlement and development.

With this background, we built the most vibrant, free, and open society on earth. The proof is in the pudding. Peoples of all beliefs, ethnicities, and goals have decided this is the place to be.

But we are metamorphosing at a rapidly increasing pace. Gone is a functioning congress as we see thousand-page bills passed on party-line votes with little to no public process, little to no debate, and little to no amendments. Secret negotiations by staff and lobbyists take the place of openness among our representatives. Gone is the strong emphasis on federalism as we see more and more efforts to subject state authority to federal rules. The feds coming for control of state elections is scary. Gone is an independent and observant media as it blatantly chooses sides in the great issues of the day instead of holding all to account. Gone is the independent power centers of business, entertainment, and even religion as all prostrate themselves to ideology.

Getting back to Niemoller‘s time. He witnessed the onslaught of government, business, media, finance, education, and law combining to a single force. His warming pot boiled over. We are seeing government, business, media, tech, entertainment, coalescing in a similar fashion. COVID provided the opportunity to turn up the heat in the pot while telling us that was in our best interest. We still might distrust power and authority, but power and authority seems to be winning.

They came for our history.
They came for our arts.
They came for our business.
They came for our speech.

What do they want?

Our obedience.
 

NPT

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When did liberals become so scary for you? Was it Obama that pushed you over the edge? Before that, even?
Lets not make it about COH.... start your own thread about him. What he is talking about didn't just start and he didn't say it did.... it's been going on for years. Biden is just pushing it a little faster than previous presidents.
 

FloatingHooz

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Martin Niemoller spoke the “First they came” words in post WWII Germany as an explanation of how the horrors of Nazism could take hold in a democratic and largely religious country. He used the frog in the pot argument to explain how bad things happen in small increments until the bad thing is large and uncontrollable.

I’m combining the Andrew Sullivan and Thousand Cuts threads here.

The founding fathers bequeathed us a system of governance and a resulting economic and social structure that was largely based on distrust of power and authority. Our federal government had a robust system of separation of powers and of checks and balances. The federal government was based on federalism where the states, using their own unique and processes ran their own affairs, selected their own leaders and their own representatives to congress. Education, business, media, entertainment, religion, and more were sources of independent and maybe even competing roles in various functions. The Europeans gave us an entrenched system of slavery and servitude that was almost exclusively race based. We also were faced with conflict and questions about native people caused by the inevitable and unstoppable rush of settlement and development.

With this background, we built the most vibrant, free, and open society on earth. The proof is in the pudding. Peoples of all beliefs, ethnicities, and goals have decided this is the place to be.

But we are metamorphosing at a rapidly increasing pace. Gone is a functioning congress as we see thousand-page bills passed on party-line votes with little to no public process, little to no debate, and little to no amendments. Secret negotiations by staff and lobbyists take the place of openness among our representatives. Gone is the strong emphasis on federalism as we see more and more efforts to subject state authority to federal rules. The feds coming for control of state elections is scary. Gone is an independent and observant media as it blatantly chooses sides in the great issues of the day instead of holding all to account. Gone is the independent power centers of business, entertainment, and even religion as all prostrate themselves to ideology.

Getting back to Niemoller‘s time. He witnessed the onslaught of government, business, media, finance, education, and law combining to a single force. His warming pot boiled over. We are seeing government, business, media, tech, entertainment, coalescing in a similar fashion. COVID provided the opportunity to turn up the heat in the pot while telling us that was in our best interest. We still might distrust power and authority, but power and authority seems to be winning.

They came for our history.
They came for our arts.
They came for our business.
They came for our speech.

What do they want?

Our obedience.

Hmmm. I’ll challenge that. They actually came for the land. The geography of America allowed for all of the things listed above. Didn’t need much government when your land was rich, ports good, rivers navigable, people scarce, and most of your scariest rivals were an ocean away. Our land allowed for this government. It can’t work everywhere. For examples, see everywhere. Lol.

And America trucks along with a government born into dysfunction. That was always the plan. The land is that good!
 
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Bowlmania

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Martin Niemoller spoke the “First they came” words in post WWII Germany as an explanation of how the horrors of Nazism could take hold in a democratic and largely religious country. He used the frog in the pot argument to explain how bad things happen in small increments until the bad thing is large and uncontrollable.

I’m combining the Andrew Sullivan and Thousand Cuts threads here.

The founding fathers bequeathed us a system of governance and a resulting economic and social structure that was largely based on distrust of power and authority. Our federal government had a robust system of separation of powers and of checks and balances. The federal government was based on federalism where the states, using their own unique and processes ran their own affairs, selected their own leaders and their own representatives to congress. Education, business, media, entertainment, religion, and more were sources of independent and maybe even competing roles in various functions. The Europeans gave us an entrenched system of slavery and servitude that was almost exclusively race based. We also were faced with conflict and questions about native people caused by the inevitable and unstoppable rush of settlement and development.

With this background, we built the most vibrant, free, and open society on earth. The proof is in the pudding. Peoples of all beliefs, ethnicities, and goals have decided this is the place to be.

But we are metamorphosing at a rapidly increasing pace. Gone is a functioning congress as we see thousand-page bills passed on party-line votes with little to no public process, little to no debate, and little to no amendments. Secret negotiations by staff and lobbyists take the place of openness among our representatives. Gone is the strong emphasis on federalism as we see more and more efforts to subject state authority to federal rules. The feds coming for control of state elections is scary. Gone is an independent and observant media as it blatantly chooses sides in the great issues of the day instead of holding all to account. Gone is the independent power centers of business, entertainment, and even religion as all prostrate themselves to ideology.

Getting back to Niemoller‘s time. He witnessed the onslaught of government, business, media, finance, education, and law combining to a single force. His warming pot boiled over. We are seeing government, business, media, tech, entertainment, coalescing in a similar fashion. COVID provided the opportunity to turn up the heat in the pot while telling us that was in our best interest. We still might distrust power and authority, but power and authority seems to be winning.

They came for our history.
They came for our arts.
They came for our business.
They came for our speech.

What do they want?

Our obedience.
And you accuse others of hyperbole? Good God, man. Do you need a sedative?

The biggest problem today is the internet and social media serving as a conduit for the mass dissemination and consumption of misinformation which ignorant people (including many here) eagerly gobble up.
 

mcmurtry66

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And you accuse others of hyperbole? Good God, man. Do you need a sedative?

The biggest problem today is the internet and social media serving as a conduit for the mass dissemination and consumption of misinformation which ignorant people (including many here) eagerly gobble up.
absolutely true. further what was once respected outlets (at least ostensibly) are now just as culpable. what's the fix?
 

hoot1

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Crazy me.

I was thinking Congressional dysfunction was making state governments more powerful and important in our daily lives.
 

Bowlmania

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absolutely true. further what was once respected outlets (at least ostensibly) are now just as culpable. what's the fix?
I wish I knew, mac. Something that would help, though, is if people would trust their own eyes and ears (we're all witnesses to much of what's going on), read (from sources across the spectrum) and think.
 

mcmurtry66

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I wish I knew, mac. Something that would help, though, is if people would trust their own eyes and ears (we're all witnesses to much of what's going on), read (from sources across the spectrum) and think.
1000%
 

mushroomgod_1

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Apr 9, 2012
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Martin Niemoller spoke the “First they came” words in post WWII Germany as an explanation of how the horrors of Nazism could take hold in a democratic and largely religious country. He used the frog in the pot argument to explain how bad things happen in small increments until the bad thing is large and uncontrollable.

I’m combining the Andrew Sullivan and Thousand Cuts threads here.

The founding fathers bequeathed us a system of governance and a resulting economic and social structure that was largely based on distrust of power and authority. Our federal government had a robust system of separation of powers and of checks and balances. The federal government was based on federalism where the states, using their own unique and processes ran their own affairs, selected their own leaders and their own representatives to congress. Education, business, media, entertainment, religion, and more were sources of independent and maybe even competing roles in various functions. The Europeans gave us an entrenched system of slavery and servitude that was almost exclusively race based. We also were faced with conflict and questions about native people caused by the inevitable and unstoppable rush of settlement and development.

With this background, we built the most vibrant, free, and open society on earth. The proof is in the pudding. Peoples of all beliefs, ethnicities, and goals have decided this is the place to be.

But we are metamorphosing at a rapidly increasing pace. Gone is a functioning congress as we see thousand-page bills passed on party-line votes with little to no public process, little to no debate, and little to no amendments. Secret negotiations by staff and lobbyists take the place of openness among our representatives. Gone is the strong emphasis on federalism as we see more and more efforts to subject state authority to federal rules. The feds coming for control of state elections is scary. Gone is an independent and observant media as it blatantly chooses sides in the great issues of the day instead of holding all to account. Gone is the independent power centers of business, entertainment, and even religion as all prostrate themselves to ideology.

Getting back to Niemoller‘s time. He witnessed the onslaught of government, business, media, finance, education, and law combining to a single force. His warming pot boiled over. We are seeing government, business, media, tech, entertainment, coalescing in a similar fashion. COVID provided the opportunity to turn up the heat in the pot while telling us that was in our best interest. We still might distrust power and authority, but power and authority seems to be winning.

They came for our history.
They came for our arts.
They came for our business.
They came for our speech.

What do they want?

Our obedience.

The Constitution was designed for a smaller population and smaller federal govt.

The Constitution's just a piece of paper. The more the federal govt becomes entwined with out daily lives, the less relevance the Constitution will have. There's too much power and $ involved to let it stand in the way.
 

mainway_toys

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I always thought CO Hoosier was a guy in Colorado. Now I suspect "he" is actually Cindy in Ohio.

 

hoot1

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In theory, that would be correct. But the expansion of Federal Executive power has made that not so.
HDG, like all those Executive Orders which get thrown out when a president from the other party takes the office.
 

HooDatGuy

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HDG, are you thinking about the so-called Deep State ?
I’m talking about the 2 million non-military, non postal service employees of the executive branch and their dozens of respective federal agencies that churn out more policy in a week than executive order or congressional legislation could in a week.

You are the one thinking about the deep state.
 

T.M.P.

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Martin Niemoller spoke the “First they came” words in post WWII Germany as an explanation of how the horrors of Nazism could take hold in a democratic and largely religious country. He used the frog in the pot argument to explain how bad things happen in small increments until the bad thing is large and uncontrollable.

I’m combining the Andrew Sullivan and Thousand Cuts threads here.

The founding fathers bequeathed us a system of governance and a resulting economic and social structure that was largely based on distrust of power and authority. Our federal government had a robust system of separation of powers and of checks and balances. The federal government was based on federalism where the states, using their own unique and processes ran their own affairs, selected their own leaders and their own representatives to congress. Education, business, media, entertainment, religion, and more were sources of independent and maybe even competing roles in various functions. The Europeans gave us an entrenched system of slavery and servitude that was almost exclusively race based. We also were faced with conflict and questions about native people caused by the inevitable and unstoppable rush of settlement and development.

With this background, we built the most vibrant, free, and open society on earth. The proof is in the pudding. Peoples of all beliefs, ethnicities, and goals have decided this is the place to be.

But we are metamorphosing at a rapidly increasing pace. Gone is a functioning congress as we see thousand-page bills passed on party-line votes with little to no public process, little to no debate, and little to no amendments. Secret negotiations by staff and lobbyists take the place of openness among our representatives. Gone is the strong emphasis on federalism as we see more and more efforts to subject state authority to federal rules. The feds coming for control of state elections is scary. Gone is an independent and observant media as it blatantly chooses sides in the great issues of the day instead of holding all to account. Gone is the independent power centers of business, entertainment, and even religion as all prostrate themselves to ideology.

Getting back to Niemoller‘s time. He witnessed the onslaught of government, business, media, finance, education, and law combining to a single force. His warming pot boiled over. We are seeing government, business, media, tech, entertainment, coalescing in a similar fashion. COVID provided the opportunity to turn up the heat in the pot while telling us that was in our best interest. We still might distrust power and authority, but power and authority seems to be winning.

They came for our history.
They came for our arts.
They came for our business.
They came for our speech.

What do they want?

Our obedience.
He was speaking of goosesteppers like you. You and people like you were the ones that did nothing.

Another gaslight attempt at a down is up, up is down narrative.. just like your Orwell post.
 

CO. Hoosier

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A few decent posts here. Let me try a simpler way to explain

We are becoming a nation of mimics. We are are Losing the ability for independent thinking. Why? Independence involves risk, risk of losing friends, jobs, stature, power, authority or more. Generalization for sure. But mostly true.

I‘m a car guy. I’ll use the auto industry as an analogy. In the late fifty’s we had fins. In the early 2000’s we had rounded shapes and sleek bodies. Now we get sharp angles and aggressive looking shapes. All mimics. That’s okay for cars. It’s bad for ideas and thinking.

We now have government, media, academia, K-12 education, entertainment and even sports mimicking each other. That might be harmless, but the consequences of straying are becoming more frequent and more severe.

I see “we believe” yard signs in my neighborhood. I assume those who display those signs are signaling their virtue. I see them as mimics. I see people who show those signs as not capable of critical thinking. I see such people as saying the debate is over and the science is settled. I say never to both.

Now we are embarking on a journey of “equity“. Can anything be more destructive of individual characteristics and thought than the deadening concepts of equality and equity? The variety brought by differences is what drives a society. We constantly seek equilibrium in economics and sociology. It’s an aspiration, not a destination.
 
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mashnut

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I think what people fail to understand is that multi-culturalism is the culprit. Shouldn’t we strive for a common culture? A common culture in in the US seems to me is what the founding fathers, Lincoln, and MLK envisioned. It’s not easy to achieve and might always be an aspiration. Sadly, it seems to me that we have abandoned the notion of a common culture and common social compact as we drift towards maintaining and furthering our cultural differences. Cultural and individual assimilation is not seen as a worthy goal.

Now we are embarking on a journey of “equity“. Can anything be more destructive of individual characteristics and thought than the deadening concepts of equality and equity? The variety brought by differences is what drives a society. We constantly seek equilibrium in economics and sociology. It’s an aspiration, not a destination.

When people have a different culture from you, they're supposed to assimilate and not emphasize differences. When people coalesce around ideas you don't like, assimilation is a bad thing. Cool story.
 

TommyCracker

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I wish I knew, mac. Something that would help, though, is if people would trust their own eyes and ears (we're all witnesses to much of what's going on), read (from sources across the spectrum) and think.

Hammer to the nail. Going further we need to better understand motives, recognize patterns behind those motives and then critically ask ourselves on the odds of sense.

I can't believe I am saying that last part but the rise of Q is an example of the game that is being played today on both sides.

Most common is the create, assign and attack case (which is a version of the straw man argument).

That is create some narrative that you know will likely cause a reaction, assign it to someone or something and then attack that entity.

Q is a classic case. Create a shocking narrative (child sex trafficking, pedophilia and satanic cult groups), assign it to something (key democratic leaders, outspoken Hollywood elites) then attack those groups that you've tied to the narrative you made up to build a violent crusade of ignorance.

It's proven that it's an extremely powerful manipulation technique when you are already susceptable to want to believe things against your political adversaries.

That goes for all of us.
 

cosmickid

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I always thought CO Hoosier was a guy in Colorado. Now I suspect "he" is actually Cindy in Ohio.

It's just like the County Govt in NC who just announced they are banning (canceling) Coke product vending machines from all govt buildings. It was obviously a well-thought-out response (DWS) to Coke CEO James Quincey opposing the GA GOP bill and advocating for MORE inclusion in the voting process.

Strange how 5 Commissioners in a 3-2 vote decide to CANCEL a product headquartered in a neighboring state because they feel that somehow protesting against SUPPRESSING the vote in that state is an example of "cancel culture". Maybe they should look up the term "unintentional irony".

And I'm not sure exactly what they feel Quincey is "canceling", since the Legislators enacting this law are basically demonstrating a partisan attempt to regulate the voting procedures of a slight majority of citizens who voted against them, and they in NO WAY represent... I think Commissioner Harris (unintentionally) outs himself...

"In the letter to Quincey, Harris said the beverage company supports "the out-of-control cancel culture and bigoted leftist mob" when it chooses the social issues it wants to speak up about". He also refers to Coke as "favoring the Democrat party", which is a strange admission coming from someone accusing others of a Partisan bias.

I mean the people of GA ELECTED in STATEWIDE elections a Democrat for POTUS, as well as BOTH US Senators. None of the people in GA who drafted and supported this bill were elected statewide by ALL of the voters in GA, and NONE are Democrats. So exactly WHICH people of GA is this bill REPRESENTING, because it sure doesn't represent the majority of folks who just voted...


This is almost as ironic as CoH using the words of a man like Niemoller who was basically decrying the effects of xenophobic fascism and ultra Nationalism in defense of people who are so xenophobic that they hate outsiders. They are also big on using terminology to define people they hate when it's clear they really don't even know what that terminology actually means...

I mean the first group that Niemoller even mentions are "socialists". Is there anything a Trump cultist hates more than a socialist, even though they couldn't accurately define "socialism" if their life depended on it? You know uber-rich "socialists" like Soros, Gates, etc... Heck Soros ticks the box for #3 as well- a twofer...

"First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was not a socialist.

Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out— because I was not a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me."

And let's be honest, their hatred for "trade unionists" and Jews (except Israelis) isn't too far behind...

Why are Pubs NEVER in favor of INCLUSION, when it comes to involving people in the political (voting) process? Of course, that's a rhetorical (trick) question... ;)
 
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CO. Hoosier

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It's just like the County Govt in NC who just announced they are banning (canceling) Coke product vending machines from all govt buildings. It was obviously a well-thought-out response (DWS) to Coke CEO James Quincey opposing the GA GOP bill and advocating for MORE inclusion in the voting process.

Strange how 5 Commissioners in a 3-2 vote decide to CANCEL a product headquartered in a neighboring state because they feel that somehow protesting against SUPPRESSING the vote in that state is an example of "cancel culture". Maybe they should look up the term "unintentional irony". And I'm not sure exactly what they feel Quincey is "canceling", since the Legislators enacting this law is basically demonstrating a partisan attempt to regulate the voting procedures of a slight majority of citizens who voted against them, and they in NO WAY represent...


This is almost as ironic as CoH using the words of a man like Niemoller who was basically decrying the effects of xenophobic fascism and ultra Nationalism in defense of people who are so xenophobic that they hate outsiders. They are also big on using terminology to define people they hate when it's clear they really don't even know what that terminology actually means...

I mean the first group that Niemoller even mentions are "socialists". Is there anything a Trump cultist hates more than a socialist, even though they couldn't accurately define "socialism" if their life depended on it...You know uber-rich "socialists" like Soros, Gates, etc...

"First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was not a socialist.

Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out— because I was not a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me."

And let's be honest, their hatred for "trade unionists" and Jews (except Israelis) isn't too far behind...
The only takeaway from this post is that you have no clue about conservatives in general and zero about me in particular.
 

CO. Hoosier

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When people have a different culture from you, they're supposed to assimilate and not emphasize differences. When people coalesce around ideas you don't like, assimilation is a bad thing. Cool story.
Lol. You have no idea what you are talking about. I think you learned how to think from watching Big Bird.
 
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CO. Hoosier

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Hammer to the nail. Going further we need to better understand motives, recognize patterns behind those motives and then critically ask ourselves on the odds of sense.

I can't believe I am saying that last part but the rise of Q is an example of the game that is being played today on both sides.

Most common is the create, assign and attack case (which is a version of the straw man argument).

That is create some narrative that you know will likely cause a reaction, assign it to someone or something and then attack that entity.

Q is a classic case. Create a shocking narrative (child sex trafficking, pedophilia and satanic cult groups), assign it to something (key democratic leaders, outspoken Hollywood elites) then attack those groups that you've tied to the narrative you made up to build a violent crusade of ignorance.

It's proven that it's an extremely powerful manipulation technique when you are already susceptable to want to believe things against your political adversaries.

That goes for all of us.
If it wasn’t for people like you, I’d have no idea WTF Q is. I still don’t. But you goat and a few others talk about it all the time.
 

TheOriginalHappyGoat

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Margaritaville
If it wasn’t for people like you, I’d have no idea WTF Q is. I still don’t. But you goat and a few others talk about it all the time.
While I don't recall talking about Q very often at all, I do appreciate you recognizing that you'd be dreadfully ignorant without the help of others, and for trying to ascribe to me some credit for keeping you informed.
 

TommyCracker

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If it wasn’t for people like you, I’d have no idea WTF Q is. I still don’t. But you goat and a few others talk about it all the time.
Well ya might want to get to know them as they make up a sizeable chunk our the party you identify with.


Hell you've even got one representing your state.

Don't have the exact number but Q candidates are popping up all over the place with R designations so.... you're welcome for the information?
 

hoot1

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I’m talking about the 2 million non-military, non postal service employees of the executive branch and their dozens of respective federal agencies that churn out more policy in a week than executive order or congressional legislation could in a week.

You are the one thinking about the deep state.
HDG, can I conclude from your post that the federal government can function to meet all the laws and regulations passed over the years with only the military and postal workers ?

You might be right in some respects as reforming the government from time to time over the years has ended up turning over functions of the bureaucrats to the private sector.

Heck, even the military has turned over some of its duties to private contractors.

By the way, regardless of your political tribe (whether it is called the government bureaucracy or the Deep State) reforming government to carry out the laws efficiently so as to cut spending and lower taxes is something to seriously think about.
 
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CO. Hoosier

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He was speaking of goosesteppers like you. You and people like you were the ones that did nothing.

Another gaslight attempt at a down is up, up is down narrative.. just like your Orwell post.
You post like you own Niemoller and Orwell. You are the kind they spoke about. Your post establishes that pretty well.
 
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UncleMark

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So, after all this time, the sky really is falling? Is that what you're getting at?
 

cosmickid

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If it wasn’t for people like you, I’d have no idea WTF Q is. I still don’t. But you goat and a few others talk about it all the time.
You sound like Louie Gohmert...

He gave a speech at a QAnon event in Dallas over the weekend in which he downplayed the Jan 6 riot. Afterwards, he tried to tell people he didn't know what "Q" is, despite standing in front of a QAnon banner while speaking...


Other notable attendees early on in the weekend included Texas GOP Chair Allen West and newly rebranded biker chick Sydney Powell, of the infamous Trump legal circus...

Here she is explaining how that Constitutional standard of "reinstatement" functions...


Then on Memorial Day, the real hero of this convention of idiots, disgraced former Natl Security Advisor Mikey Flynn took the stage. The highlight of his appearance was his endorsement of a Myanmar type "military coup" in the US...


Notice how all these folks are posing in front of a Qanon banner? Not only is the symbol in the shape of a Q, but the banner on the cowboy hat is emblazoned with the QAnon motto...

Strange how all of this has escaped your notice. Esp the Flynn debacle, since a number of military people including McCaffrey, have labeled what he said as "very dangerous"...

 

mcmurtry66

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You sound like Louie Gohmert...

He gave a speech at a QAnon event in Dallas over the weekend in which he downplayed the Jan 6 riot. Afterwards, he tried to tell people he didn't know what "Q" is, despite standing in front of a QAnon banner while speaking...



Other notable attendees early on in the weekend included Texas GOP Chair Allen West and newly rebranded biker chick Sydney Powell, of the infamous Trump legal circus...

Here she is explaining how that Constitutional standard of "reinstatement" functions...



Then on Memorial Day, the real hero of this convention of idiots, disgraced former Natl Security Advisor Mikey Flynn took the stage. The highlight of his appearance was his endorsement of a Myanmar type "military coup" in the US...



Notice how all these folks are posing in front of a Qanon banner? Not only is the symbol in the shape of a Q, but the banner on the cowboy hat is emblazoned with the QAnon motto...

Strange how all of this has escaped your notice. Esp the Flynn debacle, since a number of military people including McCaffrey, have labeled what he said as "very dangerous"...

Lmao you follow more shit about Q than probably half the members in it.
 

cosmickid

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I always thought CO Hoosier was a guy in Colorado. Now I suspect "he" is actually Cindy in Ohio.

Some good news/bad news developments on that front. The post commander of that location has resigned and the post will likely close. The Ohio state Legion is in the process of revoking its charter and issued a blistering condemnation of what happened...

"The American Legion Department of Ohio does not hold space for members, veterans, or families of veterans who believe that censoring black history is acceptable behavior," read a Friday statement."

The bad news is twofold, starting with the loss of a post where local veterans congregate resulting from actions taken by leadership that most of them were not complicit with. That is both unfair and sad...

Also, it seems likely that this will become the latest cause celebre for the Right, and will likely become the star attraction for Hannity in the immediate future. So we better be prepared for ad nauseum accounts of how the Ohio Legion's actions exemplify CRT and "cancel culture" in the flesh...

 

CO. Hoosier

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Aug 29, 2001
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You sound like Louie Gohmert...

He gave a speech at a QAnon event in Dallas over the weekend in which he downplayed the Jan 6 riot. Afterwards, he tried to tell people he didn't know what "Q" is, despite standing in front of a QAnon banner while speaking...



Other notable attendees early on in the weekend included Texas GOP Chair Allen West and newly rebranded biker chick Sydney Powell, of the infamous Trump legal circus...

Here she is explaining how that Constitutional standard of "reinstatement" functions...



Then on Memorial Day, the real hero of this convention of idiots, disgraced former Natl Security Advisor Mikey Flynn took the stage. The highlight of his appearance was his endorsement of a Myanmar type "military coup" in the US...



Notice how all these folks are posing in front of a Qanon banner? Not only is the symbol in the shape of a Q, but the banner on the cowboy hat is emblazoned with the QAnon motto...

Strange how all of this has escaped your notice. Esp the Flynn debacle, since a number of military people including McCaffrey, have labeled what he said as "very dangerous"...

Wut? Strange how this has escaped my notice? I don’t know about you, but to me Q is a chess notation.
 
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