Daily Show on Critical Race Theory

TommyCracker

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A different point of view if curious.

My take, it's not about making white people feel like racists, it's attempting to understand how racism has impacted our history.

Similar to how Germany discusses the rise of Nazis. They don't whitewash it or glorify it, they simply try to inform how and why things came to be so we can learn.

Enjoy.

 

JamieDimonsBalls

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A different point of view if curious.

My take, it's not about making white people feel like racists, it's attempting to understand how racism has impacted our history.

Similar to how Germany discusses the rise of Nazis. They don't whitewash it or glorify it, they simply try to inform how and why things came to be so we can learn.

Enjoy.


If there is one thing I'm certain of - Trevor Noah has half the talent of Colbert.
 

cosmickid

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A different point of view if curious.

My take, it's not about making white people feel like racists, it's attempting to understand how racism has impacted our history.

Similar to how Germany discusses the rise of Nazis. They don't whitewash it or glorify it, they simply try to inform how and why things came to be so we can learn.

Enjoy.

This is one of the hot button issues the Pubs are desperately trying to gain traction with.
They want to pretend that it resonates outside the "base" (it doesn't) and that it isn't racist. We all know there are no racists in the GOP, but that claim keeps getting undermined by some of the people so desperate to attack CRT and use it as a cultural wedge issue... For example...

Rep Ray Garafalo (GOP-LA) introduced a bill in the State Legislature to, in effect, ban the teaching of CRT in LA schools. He made the regrettable slip of the tongue where he claimed that students needed to be taught "the good,bad and ugly" of slavery and in a clip that went viral was immediately confronted by fellow GOP Rep Stephanie Hilferty who blurted out "there is no good to slavery...


Now if you watch the entire clip of the actual exchange you realize how tortured and awkward a discourse it is, with Garafalo being forced to admit that just like the Holocaust we know slavery was evil, despite the fact that there are no living witnesses to rely on with first-hand knowledge. People who commented on the video felt it was actually a Freudian slip by Garafalo, but I'll reserve judgement on whether or not he is racist because really don't know...

He was forced to withdraw his bill, but the aftermath revealed a few more splits within the GOP. The story came to my attention when I read about a prominent women named Martha Huckaby, who is President of the Republican Women's Club of New Orleans. Huckaby posted a FB attack on Hilferty and actually doubled down on the idea that we don't KNOW slavery was "bad"...

“What is Stephanie Hilferty doing here? Why is she trying to trap a Republican and twist his words?” Huckabay wrote on Facebook. “How does she 100% know there is ‘no good to slavery’ if none of us were around during slavery?”

She then went a step further...

“Weren’t some slaves treated really well?” she noted. “I know in the Bible they were.”

More details here...



No offense to Martha, but she has exposed herself here, and basically is assuming the slavery counterpart of a Holocaust denier. Some of the supporting comments coming out of the woodwork illustrate the PR problem the Pubs have outside of the base in attacking CRT and trying to claim the attacks aren't steeped in racism.

And Garafalo is not just some run of the mill State Legislator proposing wacky Legislation. He is actually (for the time being) the head of the state's education committee...
 

CO. Hoosier

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A different point of view if curious.

My take, it's not about making white people feel like racists, it's attempting to understand how racism has impacted our history.

Similar to how Germany discusses the rise of Nazis. They don't whitewash it or glorify it, they simply try to inform how and why things came to be so we can learn.

Enjoy.

The due process clause, the 4th, 5th, 6th, 13,th, snd 14th, Amendments, Brown vs. The Board of Education, and the Civil Rights Laws, were all written by not just white people, but white males. Are these great expressions of equal and civil rights examples of white male racist history? Yeah, I’ve cherry picked. But to say we are a historically racist country also requires cherry picking. I hate the generalizations in the video link. Generalizations built on selected history is terribly divisive and destructive. Division and racial chaos is unfortunately seen as good politics.
 
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TommyCracker

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The due process clause, the 4th, 5th, 6th, 13,th, snd 14th, Amendments, Brown vs. The Board of Education, and the Civil Rights Laws, were all written by not just white people, but white males. Are these great expressions of equal and civil rights examples of white male racist history? Yeah, I’ve cherry picked. But to say we are a historically racist country also requires cherry picking. I hate the generalizations in the video link. Generalizations built on selected history is terribly divisive and destructive. Division and racial chaos is unfortunately seen as good politics.

So you don't think we have a racist history, definitely not one to examine and study?

Aren't you big on the marketplace of ideas and tough but open discussion in the hopes to better understand how our society formed so we can make better informed choices?

I think he said it pretty succinctly....do you want to learn from history or wallow in it?

I think the distinction are some claiming that this makes current white males the big baddy which I think is misinformed or grossly exaggerated.

It's not to make you feel guilty for being white nor is it expecting you to apologize for being white.

It simply is designed to inform you of how our race relations have impacted our societal system from a historical perspective.

One of his points was that only 8% of high school seniors understand that the civil war was over slavery.

A handful of states don't even cover slavery in their curriculum.

Those are embarrassing numbers.

We're not a cult.
 
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Marvin the Martian

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The due process clause, the 4th, 5th, 6th, 13,th, snd 14th, Amendments, Brown vs. The Board of Education, and the Civil Rights Laws, were all written by not just white people, but white males. Are these great expressions of equal and civil rights examples of white male racist history? Yeah, I’ve cherry picked. But to say we are a historically racist country also requires cherry picking. I hate the generalizations in the video link. Generalizations built on selected history is terribly divisive and destructive. Division and racial chaos is unfortunately seen as good politics.
Did due process, 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments apply to slaves? With Dred Scot they did not necessarily apply to free Blacks if a southerner claimed they were property.

To be fair to southerners, the same amendments did not necessarily apply to Japanese Americans under Roosevelt.
 

IUCrazy2

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This is one of the hot button issues the Pubs are desperately trying to gain traction with.
They want to pretend that it resonates outside the "base" (it doesn't) and that it isn't racist. We all know there are no racists in the GOP, but that claim keeps getting undermined by some of the people so desperate to attack CRT and use it as a cultural wedge issue... For example...

Rep Ray Garafalo (GOP-LA) introduced a bill in the State Legislature to, in effect, ban the teaching of CRT in LA schools. He made the regrettable slip of the tongue where he claimed that students needed to be taught "the good,bad and ugly" of slavery and in a clip that went viral was immediately confronted by fellow GOP Rep Stephanie Hilferty who blurted out "there is no good to slavery...



Now if you watch the entire clip of the actual exchange you realize how tortured and awkward a discourse it is, with Garafalo being forced to admit that just like the Holocaust we know slavery was evil, despite the fact that there are no living witnesses to rely on with first-hand knowledge. People who commented on the video felt it was actually a Freudian slip by Garafalo, but I'll reserve judgement on whether or not he is racist because really don't know...

He was forced to withdraw his bill, but the aftermath revealed a few more splits within the GOP. The story came to my attention when I read about a prominent women named Martha Huckaby, who is President of the Republican Women's Club of New Orleans. Huckaby posted a FB attack on Hilferty and actually doubled down on the idea that we don't KNOW slavery was "bad"...

“What is Stephanie Hilferty doing here? Why is she trying to trap a Republican and twist his words?” Huckabay wrote on Facebook. “How does she 100% know there is ‘no good to slavery’ if none of us were around during slavery?”

She then went a step further...

“Weren’t some slaves treated really well?” she noted. “I know in the Bible they were.”

More details here...





No offense to Martha, but she has exposed herself here, and basically is assuming the slavery counterpart of a Holocaust denier. Some of the supporting comments coming out of the woodwork illustrate the PR problem the Pubs have outside of the base in attacking CRT and trying to claim the attacks aren't steeped in racism.

And Garafalo is not just some run of the mill State Legislator proposing wacky Legislation. He is actually (for the time being) the head of the state's education committee...

CRT is a garbage theory. I don't want my kids wasting time on your guilt for being white when they should be learning how to read, write, and do math.

You want better outcomes in poor communities, start by telling them at a very young age that despite what their hormones are going to be telling them, sex at a young age is probably one of the most risky behaviors that they can be involved in. Statistics bare that out and everyone is afraid of being called an out of touch prude so instead of addressing the fact that in today's world all this CRT bull shit amounts to a minuscule ant hill in your life, the 70% of children who grow up with a single mother in the black community is just a "meh" topic when it is probably the biggest factor on the performance gap.

I have looked into Kendi's nonsense. Sorry, changing the definition of anti-racism into discrimination that does what I want should not ****ing fly in grade school. My children are not oppressors and the only people oppressing minorities are those who keep telling them that the deck is perpetually stacked against them unless some white savior steps in to make it all better. It's destructive horseshit to make people like you feel better about yourself.

Things were bad then. Things are not that bad now. Stop acting like we are still in the 1950's.
 

Courtsensetwo

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A different point of view if curious.

My take, it's not about making white people feel like racists, it's attempting to understand how racism has impacted our history.

Similar to how Germany discusses the rise of Nazis. They don't whitewash it or glorify it, they simply try to inform how and why things came to be so we can learn.

Enjoy.

Trevor is hypocritical here in that he praises the German approach to teaching Nazi history because they don't label current citizens with the sins of their forefathers. Yet he fails to recognize the reason teaching US racial history is failing is because great effort is made to label current white citizens with the sins of their forefathers.
 

Marvin the Martian

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For those who are certain there is nothing today, take a look at the study below. iPods were sold, some being held by a Black hand, some by a White. Guess which iPods received 1) more interest 2) higher bids.

 

CO. Hoosier

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o you don't think we have a racist history, definitely not one to examine and study?
Thats not what I said and I implied the exact opposite.
Aren't you big on the marketplace of ideas and tough but open discussion in the hopes to better understand how our society formed so we can make better informed choices?
I’m very big on the marketplace of ideas. i have no problem with a better understanding of history. Ideas and history embedd in the 1619 project (which many historians dispute; but that is for another post) need to be taught for what they are—history. The point is that the 1619 project does not address fixing the problem of Black underachievement today and IMO impedes it.
It's not to make you feel guilty for being white nor is it expecting you to apologize for being white.

It simply is designed to inform you of how our race relations have impacted our societal system from a historical perspective.
I agree with this point. The problem is that this is not how educrats and corporate wonks apply CRT. It’s applied in a highly divisive way.

One of his points was that only 8% of high school seniors understand that the civil war was over slavery
So what? While we’d all like to have a better understanding of all history, the civil war isn’t vital to fixing why Blacks don’t get good jobs or why so many black males shoot each other every week. And the civil war being just about slavery is a gross oversimplification. The war produced the 14th Amendment which changed our system of government more than the 13th. Look again at the Gettysburg Address and what Lincoln said about why we had a war.
 
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CO. Hoosier

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Did due process, 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments apply to slaves? With Dred Scot they did not necessarily apply to free Blacks if a southerner claimed they were property.

To be fair to southerners, the same amendments did not necessarily apply to Japanese Americans under Roosevelt.
Good lord marv. Of course they didn’t apply to slaves. Why do you engage in such stupid stuff? The point is that they apply today to all including all blacks. That was the result of a terrible and costly war. Yet too many people disparage all of that because the words were written by dead white guys, some of whom owned slaves. Those expressions of freedom, liberty, and rights are pretty damned important in today’s life and need to be taught in that way, not belittled by history. Can we do even better? Sure. But we can’t do better by destroying the foundations we need to build better.
 

IU_Hickory

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Has anyone said those expressions are not important?

I would think people are capable of learning both the good and bad of history instead of some whitewashed version where we don't mention anything untoward of white people.
 

Marvin the Martian

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Good lord marv. Of course they didn’t apply to slaves. Why do you engage in such stupid stuff? The point is that they apply today to all including all blacks. That was the result of a terrible and costly war. Yet too many people disparage all of that because the words were written by dead white guys, some of whom owned slaves. Those expressions of freedom, liberty, and rights are pretty damned important in today’s life and need to be taught in that way, not belittled by history. Can we do even better? Sure. But we can’t do better by destroying the foundations we need to build better.
You made a big deal about those amendments, not me. As I pointed out, they did not even apply to Japanese in the 1940s. They did not fully apply to Blacks until the 1960s. Guess what, people are still alive from those eras.

You asked, "Are these great expressions of equal and civil rights examples of white male racist history", and the answer is YES for some of those. They specifically excluded people from those rights. If one lists a right and then excludes a race, it is racist. You did not ask about our modern interpretation. The people who wrote those things and excluded Blacks and others were racist.
 
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CO. Hoosier

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You made a big deal about those amendments, not me. As I pointed out, they did not even apply to Japanese in the 1940s. They did not fully apply to Blacks until the 1960s. Guess what, people are still alive from those eras.

You asked, "Are these great expressions of equal and civil rights examples of white male racist history", and the answer is YES for some of those. They specifically excluded people from those rights. If one lists a right and then excludes a race, it is racist. You did not ask about our modern interpretation. The people who wrote those things and excluded Blacks and others were racist.
I made a big deal out of those amendments because they are a big deal. They were a guiding light when written and a guiding light today. We are evolving. Talking about these writings in the way you have makes no more sense than talking about humans as being primitive primates.
 
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CO. Hoosier

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Has anyone said those expressions are not important?

I would think people are capable of learning both the good and bad of history instead of some whitewashed version where we don't mention anything untoward of white people.
That’s not the issue Hick. The problem is the discussion about historical black mistreatment at the hands of whites is presented as an existing condition in a way that stops any discussion of judging people by character instead of skin color dead in its tracks. Instead of promoting racial harmony, we are preventing it.
 

INRanger27

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For those who are certain there is nothing today, take a look at the study below. iPods were sold, some being held by a Black hand, some by a White. Guess which iPods received 1) more interest 2) higher bids.

Oh there you go. Next you’ll say that because black sitcoms amd movies don’t do well that is another sign of racism. Right?
 

Marvin the Martian

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I made a big deal out of those amendments because they are a big deal. They were a guiding light when written and a guiding light today. We are evolving. Talking about these writings in the way you have makes no more sense than talking about humans as being primitive primates.

See you are as reactive and crazy as the people you complain about. Yes, some have gone too far and we do not need to rename every school named Lincoln, for example.

But our founders had warts and it does no damn good to pretend they were perfect men who wrote directly from God. The document they wrote was racist because they intentionally and specifically excluded people. There is zero need to pretend that is not true.

You are pretty disingenuous in using the Gettysburg address in the war not being about slavery. Before that address Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation which very specifically made the war about slavery. But Lincoln gives a speech, does not mention slavery, and off you go.

The truth, as usual, is midway. We were once extremely racist. We are much less racist today BUT racism still exists. We deserve a participation trophy for what we have done. I know how some of you love those awards. But the race is not over. Don't celebrate until the finish line. We can aknowledge that we have made tremendous strides but still have a way to go. We can acknowledge that some of the people spoken about in revered tones for their work in our founding did do a great job in some areas but completely screwed up race. My heroes do not need to be perfect. I find Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain as compelling a figure as any in American history. But he had warts, as did Jefferson, Washington, Lincoln. I can admire much of what FDR did and still believe he was a racist sob for EO 9066. Why some demand our leaders have to be treated as perfect is as mysterious as why only their bad side matters.
 

INRanger27

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See you are as reactive and crazy as the people you complain about. Yes, some have gone too far and we do not need to rename every school named Lincoln, for example.

But our founders had warts and it does no damn good to pretend they were perfect men who wrote directly from God. The document they wrote was racist because they intentionally and specifically excluded people. There is zero need to pretend that is not true.

You are pretty disingenuous in using the Gettysburg address in the war not being about slavery. Before that address Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation which very specifically made the war about slavery. But Lincoln gives a speech, does not mention slavery, and off you go.

The truth, as usual, is midway. We were once extremely racist. We are much less racist today BUT racism still exists. We deserve a participation trophy for what we have done. I know how some of you love those awards. But the race is not over. Don't celebrate until the finish line. We can aknowledge that we have made tremendous strides but still have a way to go. We can acknowledge that some of the people spoken about in revered tones for their work in our founding did do a great job in some areas but completely screwed up race. My heroes do not need to be perfect. I find Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain as compelling a figure as any in American history. But he had warts, as did Jefferson, Washington, Lincoln. I can admire much of what FDR did and still believe he was a racist sob for EO 9066. Why some demand our leaders have to be treated as perfect is as mysterious as why only their bad side matters.
People aren’t perfect. Period. Never have been - never will be. This is the freest country on earth. Spending billions and brainwashing minority youth to think their lives are already cast is dumb, incorrect, and bigoted.

CRT is stating the obvious: people aren’t perfect. Congrats.
 

Marvin the Martian

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Oh there you go. Next you’ll say that because black sitcoms amd movies don’t do well that is another sign of racism. Right?
Curious what point am I missing? If I am buying an iPod why does it matter what color is holding it?

I get why some people may not find that a show about an urban Black family, say a Good Times, may not appeal to them. My wife loves some show about crazy Alaskan homesteaders, that environment has no interest to me because I do not relate to it at all. At the same point, if we think Blacks cannot sell iPods, cars, food, or act in tv or movies we want to see, we are describing White privilege.
 

INRanger27

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Curious what point am I missing? If I am buying an iPod why does it matter what color is holding it?

I get why some people may not find that a show about an urban Black family, say a Good Times, may not appeal to them. My wife loves some show about crazy Alaskan homesteaders, that environment has no interest to me because I do not relate to it at all. At the same point, if we think Blacks cannot sell iPods, cars, food, or act in tv or movies we want to see, we are describing White privilege.
Bullshit. All bullshit. Black actors are all over ads and people must be buying or they wouldn’t continue to be all over ads. It’s simple economics.
 
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JamieDimonsBalls

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For those who are certain there is nothing today, take a look at the study below. iPods were sold, some being held by a Black hand, some by a White. Guess which iPods received 1) more interest 2) higher bids.


And how much of that is do to racism? Are you going to ignore the criminal statistics?
 

JamieDimonsBalls

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Curious what point am I missing? If I am buying an iPod why does it matter what color is holding it?

I get why some people may not find that a show about an urban Black family, say a Good Times, may not appeal to them. My wife loves some show about crazy Alaskan homesteaders, that environment has no interest to me because I do not relate to it at all. At the same point, if we think Blacks cannot sell iPods, cars, food, or act in tv or movies we want to see, we are describing White privilege.

You'd be hard pressed to find people that don't think Denzel, Morgan Freeman, Forrest Whitaker, Don Cheadle, etc. aren't very good actors.
 

Marvin the Martian

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People aren’t perfect. Period. Never have been - never will be. This is the freest country on earth. Spending billions and brainwashing minority youth to think their lives are already cast is dumb, incorrect, and bigoted.

CRT is stating the obvious: people aren’t perfect. Congrats.

Someone posted a link about a GOP meeting where the good side of slavery wasn't discussed. I posted somewhere an article about a Tennessee state rep saying that the 3/5s clause was built in as an anti-slavery amendment. Some people aren't getting the proper teaching of history.

Does White privilege exist? I think it does. Until it does not, we should work to end it. I will agree with anyone who says we have made great progress. But again, we aren't at the finish line. If you are coaching a 4x100 team and they stop to celebrate being ahead after leg 3, I think you will see that as a problem.

I agree the die isn't cast. But at the same point the die isn't completely fair. My point is that honesty requires pointing out that fact. A Black today can get ahead. There is no structural reason they cannot. BUT they have to work a little harder, be a little better. Tell me what is wrong with that belief and why it is wrong to pursue the fair die? CO wants to emphasize MLK's speech as if we are there, we've achieved that moment of level racial playing field. I am saying we can't use MLK's speech because we haven't made it to the end. We have made gains, I'll freely and happily acknowledge that. But we ain't there.

Yippee, the country is better than it was. My goal is to see the country even better next year, and the year after. Racism IS still a problem. It isn't the problem it once was, but you aren't about to claim racism is dead. Even CO won't make that claim. So let's admit it and move on to how we reduce it even more. Yes, some may go too far. I get that, but are they a bigger problem than the ones who see racism as a virtue? Those people still exist.
 

CO. Hoosier

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But our founders had warts and it does no damn good to pretend they were perfect men who wrote directly from God. The document they wrote was racist because they intentionally and specifically excluded people. There is zero need to pretend that is not true.
Nobody is pretending anything. Quit with your silly straw men.

Sure, the reason people were excluded from all the privileges and rights of the constitution was because some who had to agree were racist. But the reason the compromise was reached was because without it, there would have been no United States of America. From the moment of the constitution’s acceptance, we never stopped debating the end of slavery. We finally accomplished that after a terrible war that would have resulted in no United States had it gone the other way. The G.A. is important for what Lincoln said, not for what he didn’t say.
 

INRanger27

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Someone posted a link about a GOP meeting where the good side of slavery wasn't discussed. I posted somewhere an article about a Tennessee state rep saying that the 3/5s clause was built in as an anti-slavery amendment. Some people aren't getting the proper teaching of history.

Does White privilege exist? I think it does. Until it does not, we should work to end it. I will agree with anyone who says we have made great progress. But again, we aren't at the finish line. If you are coaching a 4x100 team and they stop to celebrate being ahead after leg 3, I think you will see that as a problem.

I agree the die isn't cast. But at the same point the die isn't completely fair. My point is that honesty requires pointing out that fact. A Black today can get ahead. There is no structural reason they cannot. BUT they have to work a little harder, be a little better. Tell me what is wrong with that belief and why it is wrong to pursue the fair die? CO wants to emphasize MLK's speech as if we are there, we've achieved that moment of level racial playing field. I am saying we can't use MLK's speech because we haven't made it to the end. We have made gains, I'll freely and happily acknowledge that. But we ain't there.

Yippee, the country is better than it was. My goal is to see the country even better next year, and the year after. Racism IS still a problem. It isn't the problem it once was, but you aren't about to claim racism is dead. Even CO won't make that claim. So let's admit it and move on to how we reduce it even more. Yes, some may go too far. I get that, but are they a bigger problem than the ones who see racism as a virtue? Those people still exist.
Continuing to blame everything (which is what CRT does) on Racism! is a guarantee the country will not be better next year or the year after. Racists should be spotlighted and dealt with. But not CRT’s or BLM’s definition of racists - as that’s anybody who doesn’t eschew their communist doctrine.

This rhetoric is dangerous and is directly linked with billions of dollars of damage and lives ruined - both physically and financially - from rioting over instances that the usual suspects blame on Racism!
 

VanPastorMan

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Central Pennsylvania Via Washington Indiana
A different point of view if curious.

My take, it's not about making white people feel like racists, it's attempting to understand how racism has impacted our history.

Similar to how Germany discusses the rise of Nazis. They don't whitewash it or glorify it, they simply try to inform how and why things came to be so we can learn.

Enjoy.

Racism is part of every culture. Why do you think the Chinese can't stand the Japanese? Why do you think different tribes in Africa hate each other so much? It's part of the human condition and was invented by western culture and certainly not by America alone. When we look at the different African tribes and the Chinese and Japanese we can't necessarily see the differences. It's a cultural thing. But those groups see the differences between each other and it is racism.
 

Marvin the Martian

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Nobody is pretending anything. Quit with your silly straw men.

Sure, the reason people were excluded from all the privileges and rights of the constitution was because some who had to agree were racist. But the reason the compromise was reached was because without it, there would have been no United States of America. From the moment of the constitution’s acceptance, we never stopped debating the end of slavery. We finally accomplished that after a terrible war that would have resulted in no United States had it gone the other way. The G.A. is important for what Lincoln said, not for what he didn’t say.

there are two groups we can debate. The anti-slavery people who made a decision that a nation was more important than freedom for all. I might even agree with them, but the fact they made the choice to throw Blacks (and native Americans and others) under the bus is worthy of debate and discussion. It is a blemish. We can debate how big of a blemish, but it is a blemish.

The other group is the group who said slavery was more important than a nation, that their right to own slaves was the most important right of all. And of course there is a debate for them that is somewhat different than the above group.

I get why many may not hold either group in as high of a regard as a White male might.

Race played a huge role in American history. Our interactions with Native Americans, slavery, wars with Mexico. One might even say it has played a critical role. Ken Burns said America is the story of race. I think he's right. And as I said to Ranger, we've made great progress. But I'll add that doesn't mean the answer is to bury where we came from.

The ancestor who came to this country with my surname came in 1777. While that side of the family never had great wealth, what little they could get could be passed from generation to generation. I was born in 1960. That is 183 years of potential wealth handed down to me. Even if we accept 1865 for most Blacks, a Black born in 1960 would have had 95 years of potential wealth. We both know that Blacks largely weren't allowed to accumulate wealth and pass it down until much later than 1865. As I mentioned to Ranger, the die isn't cast but it isn't 100% fair. So race is still playing a role. and it isn't the fault of the people mentioning the fact.
 

Marvin the Martian

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What if they ran the experiment with Air Jordan’s instead of a high-tech electronic gizmo? Do you think the result would be different? Not a well-conceived study in my view.
Why would it matter? Why would you be more likely to buy Air Jordan's from a Black hand than you would iPods?
 

TheOriginalHappyGoat

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Margaritaville
Bullshit. All bullshit. Black actors are all over ads and people must be buying or they wouldn’t continue to be all over ads. It’s simple economics.
Ranger, you are letting your emotions control you on this topic. The study Marvin mentioned does strongly suggest latent racial bias. You should do better than simply angrily reject it.
 

CO. Hoosier

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there are two groups we can debate. The anti-slavery people who made a decision that a nation was more important than freedom for all. I might even agree with them, but the fact they made the choice to throw Blacks (and native Americans and others) under the bus is worthy of debate and discussion. It is a blemish. We can debate how big of a blemish, but it is a blemish.

The other group is the group who said slavery was more important than a nation, that their right to own slaves was the most important right of all. And of course there is a debate for them that is somewhat different than the above group.

I get why many may not hold either group in as high of a regard as a White male might.

Race played a huge role in American history. Our interactions with Native Americans, slavery, wars with Mexico. One might even say it has played a critical role. Ken Burns said America is the story of race. I think he's right. And as I said to Ranger, we've made great progress. But I'll add that doesn't mean the answer is to bury where we came from.

The ancestor who came to this country with my surname came in 1777. While that side of the family never had great wealth, what little they could get could be passed from generation to generation. I was born in 1960. That is 183 years of potential wealth handed down to me. Even if we accept 1865 for most Blacks, a Black born in 1960 would have had 95 years of potential wealth. We both know that Blacks largely weren't allowed to accumulate wealth and pass it down until much later than 1865. As I mentioned to Ranger, the die isn't cast but it isn't 100% fair. So race is still playing a role. and it isn't the fault of the people mentioning the fact.
Saying the US history is the story of race is like saying it’s the story of air. The world is composed of different races, cultures, religions, and ethnicities. In that sense all history is about race and culture. But there is more, much more. Most British colonies here are also the story of religious freedom. The Mennonites settled in Mexico in the 20th century for religious freedom. The Spanish settled California to expand the Roman Catholic faith. Westward expansion is also the story of wealth and gold. Much of western US history is also about cattle. Some settlers came west to, well, come west. There are many reasons our history is as it is. Singling out race as the most important isn’t accurate or useful.