Barron Trump's school says stay home

brianiu

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the lack of uniformity about everything covid-related drives me nuts. public schools here are largely online only. private schools here are largely in-person. youth soccer just got shut down. 11 v 11 outside on a 120 yard field, yet bars and restaurants are still open. some states are near a total lockdown. others wide open.
The virus is not impacting everyone equally. Surely rural Vermont should not have the same restrictions as Miami or Houston.
 

mcmurtry66

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The virus is not impacting everyone equally. Surely rural Vermont should not have the same restrictions as Miami or Houston.
1. how the virus is impacting communities isn't dispositive. georgia is way more open than illinois despite a marked difference in volatility in outbreaks. politics is more influential than the impact of the virus on decisions that are being made and restrictions that are or aren't being imposed.
2. inconsistent decisions/restrictions are taking place within counties, much less states or regions. they can't play soccer outside but they can go to chuck e cheese.

it makes all of this hard to reconcile - and explain to kids.
 
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hoosboot

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That simply isn’t true. I’ve also made the case that students learn more in classroom and that young children especially will struggle or find it impossible to learn online. I posted numbers in the other thread about the minuscule number of deaths for young kids. I’ve posted about steps schools could/should take to ensure safety of everyone. I’ve said big schools may have unique struggles (why I’m not advocating a one size fits all standard, as say DeSantis in Florida). So yes, while I think the strain on parents is a major issue, I’ve never suggested it is the only thing to consider and have posted about other considerations on this site. There have been many posts on this subject so it’s understandable you wouldn’t have seen or remembered everything
Appreciate your post. I think those are some good points about young children and the quality of online learning. I hope that every school district is able to navigate this in the best possible way for their students and staff to learn safely. I know they are trying. It's an absolute nightmare.
 
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brianiu

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1. how the virus is impacting communities isn't dispositive. georgia is way more open than illinois despite a marked difference in volatility in outbreaks. politics is more influential than the impact of the virus on decisions that are being made and restrictions that are or aren't being imposed.
2. inconsistent decisions/restrictions are taking place within counties, much less states or regions. they can't play soccer outside but they can go to chuck e cheese.

it makes all of this hard to reconcile - and explain to kids.
I agree on both counts. I think a lot of the discrepancies can be attributed to who is making the call. I don’t know about St Louis, but here, the state has decided to open bars and restaurants but individual districts make the call about school. The Y canceled youth soccer, which we had signed our daughter up for, but that was an organizational decision.

Personally, I prefer decisions made at the local or state level on these issues. But certainly you are right that politics are involved, moreso in some states than others
 
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zeke4ahs

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My favourite word then and now: discombobulated.
Those were both words of the week in my room. We called them sparkle words and had to be used correctly in sentences. It was hilarious hearing the kids use them in talking all week. Another of my favorites was plethora. And I spelled them correctly!
 

glmiu11

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glmiu11

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Ribbont said. Have you been to So. Ind? Many areas don't have coverage. And I mean none in the hallows. But who is going to stay home with the 8 year old and make sure the kid is 1) safe, and 2) logging on to e-learn?

-————

 

mashnut

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i'm not in that world and have no idea. pure speculation is that the private schools here (largely catholic) need the money and don't want to face people bitching about tuition reductions for online instruction. hence they're dragging the students back.
That's part of it. Private schools also have some advantages that make it a little easier to implement safety measures (I still don't personally think those are enough to make going back the right idea). Public schools will be limited in their ability to enforce distancing and mask-wearing, Private schools have much more disciplinary leeway. Many private schools also don't have the same special needs populations or the attendant legal and ethical considerations. Special needs students are going to be the toughest to keep distance, with behavioral, physical, medical, and toileting needs that necessitate close contact. Some groups of that population will be very difficult to get to wear masks. Asking those populations to stay home when their general education peers are in-person is problematic in many ways. Private schools also don't have a well-funded teachers union and their legal staff to contend with on issues of teacher safety.

That could be. But I don’t think the AAP would be saying the same thing because it’s an election year

https://services.aap.org/en/pages/2...ons-return-to-in-person-education-in-schools/
Are you just as willing to follow their second statement, released after so many misinterpreted and misused their first statement? Nobody is arguing with their original point, that in-person instruction by qualified teachers is best for children. They also point out that without additional funding, additional precautions, and attention to safety, it's not just a blanket good idea to reopen schools. If you read your link carefully, you'll see they're not being prescriptive, they're simply saying that every effort should be made to safely reopen schools, not that it's currently safe to do so. Here's their follow-up:

https://services.aap.org/en/news-ro...dents-urge-a-safe-return-to-school-this-fall/

I'm in So. Ind. And we saw how online learning worked with rural and at-risk kids. Your solutions are admirable, but if kids live in a no service area, with no Wi-Fi, and can't drive to a hotspot, then they are screwed. And that can't be fixed in a few weeks. And I am not talking about the 80% of kids who could do online. It's the 20%. Most are low income and rural. A friend of mine is a teacher at a small school. He said it was a disaster last spring. He says he thinks it will be better, but the D students who need him will likely fail. The A and B students will stay that way, with family support and a solid socioeconomic standing. But the C and D students don't have that support and will really struggle.
Would you be open to considering those factors in who is allowed to return? That 20% you mention are at much greater risk and much higher need of the benefits of in-person schooling, but the loudest voices for reopening right now are parents who don't have internet access issues. In my wife's district, most families with a stay-at-home parent are planning to send their kids back, I'd like to see that option reserved for the children of families where at-home options are impossible. The people with the money to hire lawyers will make it untenable to help the neediest.
 

brianiu

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Are you just as willing to follow their second statement, released after so many misinterpreted and misused their first statement? Nobody is arguing with their original point, that in-person instruction by qualified teachers is best for children. They also point out that without additional funding, additional precautions, and attention to safety, it's not just a blanket good idea to reopen schools. If you read your link carefully, you'll see they're not being prescriptive, they're simply saying that every effort should be made to safely reopen schools, not that it's currently safe to do so. Here's their follow-up:

https://services.aap.org/en/news-ro...dents-urge-a-safe-return-to-school-this-fall/
Yes. I’ve said before I don’t believe in a one size fits all policy. I think this is best handled district by district. What works for rural Vermont probably won’t work for Miami.
 

mashnut

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Feb 22, 2018
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Nope. Picture yourself at 16
I'm talking about teachers distancing from students. I agree that students distancing from each other is tough across all ages. This looks pretty scary to me, from Georgia this week:

 

ribbont

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That's part of it. Private schools also have some advantages that make it a little easier to implement safety measures (I still don't personally think those are enough to make going back the right idea). Public schools will be limited in their ability to enforce distancing and mask-wearing, Private schools have much more disciplinary leeway. Many private schools also don't have the same special needs populations or the attendant legal and ethical considerations. Special needs students are going to be the toughest to keep distance, with behavioral, physical, medical, and toileting needs that necessitate close contact. Some groups of that population will be very difficult to get to wear masks. Asking those populations to stay home when their general education peers are in-person is problematic in many ways. Private schools also don't have a well-funded teachers union and their legal staff to contend with on issues of teacher safety.



Are you just as willing to follow their second statement, released after so many misinterpreted and misused their first statement? Nobody is arguing with their original point, that in-person instruction by qualified teachers is best for children. They also point out that without additional funding, additional precautions, and attention to safety, it's not just a blanket good idea to reopen schools. If you read your link carefully, you'll see they're not being prescriptive, they're simply saying that every effort should be made to safely reopen schools, not that it's currently safe to do so. Here's their follow-up:

https://services.aap.org/en/news-ro...dents-urge-a-safe-return-to-school-this-fall/



Would you be open to considering those factors in who is allowed to return? That 20% you mention are at much greater risk and much higher need of the benefits of in-person schooling, but the loudest voices for reopening right now are parents who don't have internet access issues. In my wife's district, most families with a stay-at-home parent are planning to send their kids back, I'd like to see that option reserved for the children of families where at-home options are impossible. The people with the money to hire lawyers will make it untenable to help the neediest.
What I would do or consider is irrelevant as I am not on the school board. And the MCCSC listened to the union and not the science. I am not arguing that teachers should not be concerned. But for months I have told by posters, media, and officials to "listen to the science" and "listen to the experts". We'll, the science is clear and the experts have spoken.
 

glmiu11

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I'm talking about teachers distancing from students. I agree that students distancing from each other is tough across all ages. This looks pretty scary to me, from Georgia this week:

I read what you wrote. You’re 99% correct. I’m telling you; the special needs students absolutely need someone around them. They need a teacher. They (for the most part) won’t be spreading this. The high school crush and all it takes to achieve it will kill mom, dad and Mr. Smith.
 

glmiu11

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I'm talking about teachers distancing from students. I agree that students distancing from each other is tough across all ages. This looks pretty scary to me, from Georgia this week:

And yes that picture is the reality that I already knew. People have no idea what we know
 

glmiu11

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Fauci has openly and unequivocally taken positions at odds with Trump. Redfield and Birx have been far more obsequious. This is how the Trump administration operates, at every level. One reason I hate Trump so much is because he has caused me to skeptical of people like Redfield and Birx. I don't know how much they've tempered their positions so as to remain in place in hope of being able to effect policy, for the greater good of course.
Children will die.
 

glmiu11

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What I would do or consider is irrelevant as I am not on the school board. And the MCCSC listened to the union and not the science. I am not arguing that teachers should not be concerned. But for months I have told by posters, media, and officials to "listen to the science" and "listen to the experts". We'll, the science is clear and the experts have spoken.
What did they say?
 

mashnut

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What I would do or consider is irrelevant as I am not on the school board. And the MCCSC listened to the union and not the science. I am not arguing that teachers should not be concerned. But for months I have told by posters, media, and officials to "listen to the science" and "listen to the experts". We'll, the science is clear and the experts have spoken.
Much of the current reopening plan in many states and districts is based on a single study that said young children were less likely to spread COVID. Our knowledge on this is rapidly evolving, see https://www.forbes.com/sites/willia...ad-covid-19-more-efficiently-than-adults/amp/. So yes, we should follow the science, especially as we learn more and that should inform changing policies, not sticking to them.
 
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mashnut

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I read what you wrote. You’re 99% correct. I’m telling you; the special needs students absolutely need someone around them. They need a teacher. They (for the most part) won’t be spreading this. The high school crush and all it takes to achieve it will kill mom, dad and Mr. Smith.
Agree to disagree on which of the bad things is worse.
 
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glmiu11

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Much of the current reopening plan in many states and districts is based on a single study that said young children were less likely to spread COVID. Our knowledge on this is rapidly evolving, see https://www.forbes.com/sites/willia...ad-covid-19-more-efficiently-than-adults/amp/. So yes, we should follow the science, especially as we learn more and that should inform changing policies, not sticking to them.
Rapidly evolving? My 3&5 year old sneeze in the face of everything they touch. All kids want to touch and consider themselves Superman from about 9 on. (3on?)
Don’t get me wrong. Thank you for trying to point out to people what they don’t know is about to kill them.
 

ribbont

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Much of the current reopening plan in many states and districts is based on a single study that said young children were less likely to spread COVID. Our knowledge on this is rapidly evolving, see https://www.forbes.com/sites/willia...ad-covid-19-more-efficiently-than-adults/amp/. So yes, we should follow the science, especially as we learn more and that should inform changing policies, not sticking to them.
True if one only looks at covid and not abuse, malnutrition, depression, suicide, etc. But the top experts, Redfield and Fauci, think we need to go back, and they review all the data everyday.
 

glmiu11

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So far the schools here have not reported any positive cases since the June 2nd re-opening. But they are pretty diligent about putting measures prior to re-opening.
Thank God. This country needs to see it can be done RIGHT.
there are no SHORTCUTS
 

sglowrider

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Thank God. This country needs to see it can be done RIGHT.
there are no SHORTCUTS
There isn't any shortcuts. Like I said earlier in another thread, it's not that complex. But you have a guy who actively undermines the healthcare/pandemic experts it then makes it difficult to adhere to these measures.

Expertise has given way to demagoguery.
 

glmiu11

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There isn't any shortcuts. Like I said earlier in another thread, it's not that complex. But you have a guy who actively undermines the healthcare/pandemic experts which makes it difficult to adhere to these measures.

Expertise has given way to demagoguery.
It’s not just that though.
People have to make a living and their trying to make square pegs fit in round holes
its not their fault.

...And I know you know that
 
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sglowrider

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It’s not just that though.
People have to make a living and their trying to make square pegs fit in round holes
its not their fault.

...And I know you know that
I just saw an interview with Dr Stephen Sample -- he said in Dubois country that kids are not required to wear masks in classrooms? Is that true?
 

glmiu11

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I just saw an interview with Dr Stephen Sample -- he said in Dubois country that kids are not required to wear masks in classrooms? Is that true?
So very true my friend.
3-6 ft distance and all good if “you’re not gonna talk” where I go