Any thoughts on the best cars for a new teenage driver?

JamieDimonsBalls

All-American
Gold Member
Jun 28, 2015
8,026
5,347
113
nothing from japan Germany or Korea their ancestors tried to kill yours

200w.gif
 
  • Like
Reactions: larsIU

IUclover

Junior
Nov 19, 2015
1,116
852
113
I've got two teenage girls 14 & 15 who will be drivers soon. My oldest will be getting her permit this fall. In my mind the biggest concern is distractions from her phone. Obviously we've already had the discussions about how there won't be a car for her if we ever see her using her phone. I'm sure that's easier said than done.

On to the car discussion. A few years ago when we leased a Subaru Legacy I thought the new defensive protections were amazing. The camera's watching for lane control, watching when you back up, etc. I suppose for me I thought it was great, but I've also learned the systems aren't perfect. I've relied on the system while backing up in a parking lot and I'd say it's not 100% accurate. With that in mind I don't want my kids to learn to rely on these systems. They need to get into the habit of always looking behind when they back up and checking their blind spots. So that scares me a bit. So even though I know these systems are their to protect i think it may not be the best choice for a first car until they learn the basics and check blind spots regardless. As for teaching them to drive a car and stay focused, I've actually thought it wouldn't be a bad idea to look for a manual. It would force them to stay focused driving and really drive the car and be engaged in the process. On the other hand it scares me to think how many times that clutch is gonna get wrecked. I learned on a clutch, but damn it took a beating at first!

So any thoughts on this subject based on your own experiences? I have three girls in all, but the two oldest will have to share this first car during high school.
Go with a Suburu Crosstrek. Sporty and good utility, but not too big.
 

Eppy99

All-American
Gold Member
Oct 27, 2001
6,737
4,403
113
Go with a Suburu Crosstrek. Sporty and good utility, but not too big.
Actually been thinking about it. Was looking at used car prices on Carmax. They damn near want the same money for a used car as a brand new one. I wasn’t gonna buy a new car but if these used car prices don’t go down there’s no value there.
 

UncleMark

Hall of Famer
Sep 1, 2001
23,231
21,852
113
Actually been thinking about it. Was looking at used car prices on Carmax. They damn near want the same money for a used car as a brand new one. I wasn’t gonna buy a new car but if these used car prices don’t go down there’s no value there.
I had to buy my own car. My mom financed it, but I had to pay her back with monthly payments. She did waive the interest.
 

Crayfish57

Junior
Sep 18, 2013
1,343
1,414
113
I had to buy my own car. My mom financed it, but I had to pay her back with monthly payments. She did waive the interest.
I inherited a 1970 chevy pickup from my Grandpa, Seat gave out so sat on a piece of plywood to drive, lap belts, gas tank behind the seat ,defroster was ducting was bad so had shop vac tubing I found sticking through the dash to clear window. Heat was whatever came off of that but it was mine and I didnt have to ride the bus anymore
 

ORG

Hall of Famer
Gold Member
Aug 31, 2001
29,113
12,901
113
Damascus Maryland
I've got two teenage girls 14 & 15 who will be drivers soon. My oldest will be getting her permit this fall. In my mind the biggest concern is distractions from her phone. Obviously we've already had the discussions about how there won't be a car for her if we ever see her using her phone. I'm sure that's easier said than done.

On to the car discussion. A few years ago when we leased a Subaru Legacy I thought the new defensive protections were amazing. The camera's watching for lane control, watching when you back up, etc. I suppose for me I thought it was great, but I've also learned the systems aren't perfect. I've relied on the system while backing up in a parking lot and I'd say it's not 100% accurate. With that in mind I don't want my kids to learn to rely on these systems. They need to get into the habit of always looking behind when they back up and checking their blind spots. So that scares me a bit. So even though I know these systems are their to protect i think it may not be the best choice for a first car until they learn the basics and check blind spots regardless. As for teaching them to drive a car and stay focused, I've actually thought it wouldn't be a bad idea to look for a manual. It would force them to stay focused driving and really drive the car and be engaged in the process. On the other hand it scares me to think how many times that clutch is gonna get wrecked. I learned on a clutch, but damn it took a beating at first!

So any thoughts on this subject based on your own experiences? I have three girls in all, but the two oldest will have to share this first car during high school.
The "car to have" for high school girls around here is a Jeep Wrangler in WHITE. It's by far the #1 choice of girls. I asked a few why it is so popular and the answer I got is so that they can take the roof and doors off when they go to the beach.

I doubt many of these girls are going off-roading so their parents are paying for capabilities their kids will never use, And, it is not an easy car to drive: they can flip a bit quicker than many other cars. These girls live in the suburbs of Washington DC: they are not country girls.
 

ORG

Hall of Famer
Gold Member
Aug 31, 2001
29,113
12,901
113
Damascus Maryland
I had to buy my own car. My mom financed it, but I had to pay her back with monthly payments. She did waive the interest.
Check the prices of new cars. Due to the worldwide shortage of computer chips needed for modern cars, most dealers have all-time low inventories of new cars The manufacturer had to stop all production on the best-selling vehicle in the USA due to the shortage of chips. And, the vehicles that car dealers do have are typically selling at, or above, sticker price.

As a result, used car prices are at a record high.

Earlier today I took delivery on a new Ram Promaster Van that I am going to have converted into a camper van. I ordered it 6 months ago. Usually, it takes 6-8 weeks to order a van. That same van today is now sticker priced $7,000 higher than its original $43,000.

I am told that this shortage is because the USA is no longer a major player in the production of computer chips. The Korean car companies are doing well with their production. Supposedly, because they have chip production plants in Korea.
 

13thman

All-American
Gold Member
Feb 5, 2003
5,586
2,861
113
Crawfordsville, IN
I've got two teenage girls 14 & 15 who will be drivers soon. My oldest will be getting her permit this fall. In my mind the biggest concern is distractions from her phone. Obviously we've already had the discussions about how there won't be a car for her if we ever see her using her phone. I'm sure that's easier said than done.

On to the car discussion. A few years ago when we leased a Subaru Legacy I thought the new defensive protections were amazing. The camera's watching for lane control, watching when you back up, etc. I suppose for me I thought it was great, but I've also learned the systems aren't perfect. I've relied on the system while backing up in a parking lot and I'd say it's not 100% accurate. With that in mind I don't want my kids to learn to rely on these systems. They need to get into the habit of always looking behind when they back up and checking their blind spots. So that scares me a bit. So even though I know these systems are their to protect i think it may not be the best choice for a first car until they learn the basics and check blind spots regardless. As for teaching them to drive a car and stay focused, I've actually thought it wouldn't be a bad idea to look for a manual. It would force them to stay focused driving and really drive the car and be engaged in the process. On the other hand it scares me to think how many times that clutch is gonna get wrecked. I learned on a clutch, but damn it took a beating at first!

So any thoughts on this subject based on your own experiences? I have three girls in all, but the two oldest will have to share this first car during high school.
Case IH 620 QuadTrac
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Joe_Hoopsier

Noodle

Hall of Famer
Jun 19, 2001
26,240
5,790
113
Find a ~2012-2014 Honda Accord with 100-120K miles

Will last a while, be safe, reliable, and by 2013 at least they had hands free bluetooth phone and backup cameras.
Both my kids are driving Accords. I think 2013 and 2015. The 2013 probably only has 30k miles (little old lady owned it) and the other has 90k. Great cars.
 

Noodle

Hall of Famer
Jun 19, 2001
26,240
5,790
113
Here's a serious reply, for you and anyone who knows new teen drivers: BRAKES Driving School. I can't speak highly enough for this and think it should be required for every new driver! Created by a local champion Funny Car driver who's older son wrecked while driving recklessly taking his younger brother to McDs and killed them both. It's all volunteer and many instructors are from the racing and law enforcement community. Kia provides vehicles and they have stations that put young drivers through the most common errors they make as drivers (most common killer for new drivers: they go off the road and over correct and then crash. Start watching stories about teen driving crashes and you'll be surpised how often that's the cause). When you teach your kids, you generally can only expose them to the "correct" ways to drive, they show them how to react when things go wrong. A parent has to accompany them for the day, and you'll learn a lot too. Take a day and get your kids in it... some insurance companies are even offering discounts if kids take the school.

Anyway, that question came up in the Q&A session: "what's better for young drivers: big cars with more heft and metal, or newer cars with more safety features?" They said hands down, the newer cars with safety tech are safer. So reseach the safe ones and buy the newest you can afford. At the time I bought my son a 2 yo Altima that had like 160K miles, with the logic that he'd not put many miles on it and that was newer than most I could afford. Been a great car for him. Good luck, kids driving is scary for a parent!

BRAKES Driving School
Both our kids were taught by a driving instructor whose own daughter died in a car accident as a teenager. His daughter’s death influenced him to switch careers late in life. Phenomenal instructor and a great guy.
 

JamieDimonsBalls

All-American
Gold Member
Jun 28, 2015
8,026
5,347
113
The "car to have" for high school girls around here is a Jeep Wrangler in WHITE. It's by far the #1 choice of girls. I asked a few why it is so popular and the answer I got is so that they can take the roof and doors off when they go to the beach.

I doubt many of these girls are going off-roading so their parents are paying for capabilities their kids will never use, And, it is not an easy car to drive: they can flip a bit quicker than many other cars. These girls live in the suburbs of Washington DC: they are not country girls.

what beach are they going to? ocean city?
 

Joe_Hoopsier

All-Big Ten
Dec 21, 2010
4,589
1,763
113
The "car to have" for high school girls around here is a Jeep Wrangler in WHITE. It's by far the #1 choice of girls. I asked a few why it is so popular and the answer I got is so that they can take the roof and doors off when they go to the beach.

I doubt many of these girls are going off-roading so their parents are paying for capabilities their kids will never use, And, it is not an easy car to drive: they can flip a bit quicker than many other cars. These girls live in the suburbs of Washington DC: they are not country girls.
Point of order your Honor.
As a Jeep Squirrel myself, Jeepsters do not call it a "Roof", it is the top.

"So they can take their Top and doors off".