About that Arizona recount... :eek::eek:

cosmickid

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I knew it was completely partisan and being conducted by a private pro-Trump firm out of FL which has no experience with either ballots or elections and whose founder is a major supporter of the "Stop the Steal" idiocy... But reading a little closer I came upon some truly disturbing issues including the fact that it's only being conducted in Maricopa County and that they are ONLY doing recounts in races Dem candidates won. Also this "private firm" has basically been given access to what are supposed to be CONFIDENTIAL election records that contain details about individual voters...

In fact, these looney tunes had to be dissuaded (by the DOJ and threats from various attorneys) of their plan to allow people employed by the firm (Cyber Ninjas) to canvas door to door and inquire how people voted, to see if their vote was possibly changed/recorded wrong. When the GOP Pres of The AZ Senate was informed that such a move would invite legal action and in effect violated various Federal laws (like the KKK Act of 1871, provisions of the Voting Rights Act) she backed down and said they would indefinitely "defer" that part of the audit. But she left open the possibility of reinstating the policy later and "reassured," people that the auditors would not be "armed"...

Can we step back a moment here, and consider how creepy the idea of having people knock on your door and challenge your vote is, and the idea that some consideration was given to the possibility of allowing them to do so while armed (imo) borders on Fascism? If you didn't already know the kooks were running the asylum here the fact that these totally partisan auditors have been seen with blue and black pens which could easily alter ballots, combined with the fact that they are armed with ultraviolet lights to examine ballots in search of Bamboo particles in their quest to prove the ballots came from China, and you basically have a real live science fiction fantasy starring the AZ GOP Party. And in case any sane person thinks this is in any way impartial, one of the actual auditors is a GOP official named Anthony Kern, who not only attended the Trump Riot on Jan 6 but is also on the ballots he's recounting as both a losing candidate in his bid to be re-elected and a loser elector for Trump...

And in what should come as a shock to absolutely no one, Trump is completely obsessed. The owner of Cyber Ninjas has basically promised Trump that the audit will uncover "hundreds of thousands" of Trump votes, and sources have told WAPO that Trump asks about AZ every day...

 

The Vid

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cosmickid

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I have no problem with losing candidates conducting a recount/audit. It's their right, and it's a duly authorized part of the electoral process.

But this is overkill to the max- there have already been several audits in the County conducted bi-partisanly and Ducey has certified the state's results. So nothing will change as far as official results- they're just polishing Trump's knob...

And AZ GOP Attny Chris DeRose basically nailed it in the WAPO op-ed that he authored...

"Chris DeRose, a Republican Arizona election law attorney, wrote in a Washington Post op-ed that "no good can come" from the Senate's efforts. "How could anyone expect a partisan process to yield a result more accurate and trusted than the one administered by professionals of all parties following established rules?"
 

Circlejoe

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Follow the money. The only reason to support this “audit” is it allows someone to continue to fleece a percentage of the American public. The Republican leadership understands this audit is nonsense. But it will bring in the money and help them run the next election on conspiracy lies instead of policy.
 

UncleMark

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Follow the money. The only reason to support this “audit” is it allows someone to continue to fleece a percentage of the American public. The Republican leadership understands this audit is nonsense. But it will bring in the money and help them run the next election on conspiracy lies instead of policy.
Cyber Ninjas is planning on taking this show on the road. Next stops, PA and MI.
 
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cosmickid

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Cyber Ninjas is planning on taking this show on the road. Next stops, PA and MI.
Unlike AZ, both PA and MI have popular Dem Governors and Dems outnumber GOP in terms of registration in both states. They also have momentum building towards the midterms with PA esp having a retiring GOP Senator and a Senate race that could easily go Dem, with the Lamb/Fetterman winner facing Junior's favorite Trumper Sean Parnell. If it's Lamb, it would be a replay of his 2022 House victory over Parnell...

So I don't think the GOP Legislatures in either of those states could muster the support to allow the Ninjas-there would be far more blowback than in AZ and Dem Govs with the backing to thwart the efforts. GA however is a different story, given Kemp's past history and the fact that MTG is pushing for ANOTHER Recount. What would that be, like the 10th?

Pubs in AZ are flat-out looney. In addition to the craziness with the Cyber Ninja Nutjobs, a just elected Pub Official in charge of overseeing companies that regulate utilities (water, electricity) went full-on Q Tip in an interview he gave to the AZ Republic over the weekend.

The Cashew in question (named Jim O'Connor) said this, in his zeal to prevent those utilities from taking a sane move to safeguard the public, like requiring their employees to get the Covid Vac...

"I'm also aware through other information that many people who have taken the shot, many thousands of people here in the US, are deceased. And the deceased part is the good news. And please don't take that out of context," O'Connor told Ryan Randazzo of the Arizona Republic.

"But the alternative to being deceased after the shot, there are something like 40,000 plus recorded cases of people that are now potted plants. They are human vegetables. They've lost their ability to function," he said."


How in the world do you take a fabricated conspiracy theory "out of context"? :eek: :eek:
 

IU_Hickory

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He may be speaking from experience. He definitely has the brain function of a potted plant. Of course, he may have been born that way and just blaming it on the vaccine.
 

Noodle

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Headlines that start "State GOP..." have overtaken "A Florida man..." for WTF lunacy.
In case anyone is questioning this...
 

i'vegotwinners

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i don't claim to be all that knowledgeable on the subject, but as it was briefly laid out to me, the 3/5ths rule actually did work against the slave states.

otherwise, said slave states would have had more political power than they would have if blacks were counted as whole persons..

and being blacks couldn't vote, this was merely about how much representation slave states got.

again, i claim little knowledge on the subject, so if misinformed, feel free to set me straight.
 

Marvin the Martian

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i don't claim to be all that knowledgeable on the subject, but as it was briefly laid out to me, the 3/5ths rule actually did work against the slave states.

otherwise, said slave states would have had more political power than they would have if blacks were counted as whole persons..

and being blacks couldn't vote, this was merely about how much representation slave states got.

again, i claim little knowledge on the subject, so if misinformed, feel free to set me straight.
It was about money. States paid to the federal government based on their population. The South didn't want to pay taxes for each slave (Native Americans that did not pay tax were not counted at all). So the eventual compromise was they would count 3/5 for tax which also then meant they were 3/5 for representation. Native Americans counted zero toward representation. The argument wasn't over representation, it was really over taxation.
 
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MyTeamIsOnTheFloor

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Duckburg
i don't claim to be all that knowledgeable on the subject, but as it was briefly laid out to me, the 3/5ths rule actually did work against the slave states.

otherwise, said slave states would have had more political power than they would have if blacks were counted as whole persons..

and being blacks couldn't vote, this was merely about how much representation slave states got.

again, i claim little knowledge on the subject, so if misinformed, feel free to set me straight.
Getting 3/5 for slaves was also the first “ballot box” stuff

Got the Secesh 14 extra members of the House - where the federal money train starts. Get ya an extra committee spot. Maybe a Chair and a gavel.
 

Bill4411

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Doesn't Trump just need 11,780 votes to swing the election? I'm sure I heard that somewhere.
 

Noodle

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It was about money. States paid to the federal government based on their population. The South didn't want to pay taxes for each slave (Native Americans that did not pay tax were not counted at all). So the eventual compromise was they would count 3/5 for tax which also then meant they were 3/5 for representation. Native Americans counted zero toward representation. The argument wasn't over representation, it was really over taxation.
Not entirely accurate. The Three-Fifths Compromise sort of had some roots with respect to the Articles of Confederation. There was a proposal to amend the way taxes were levied on states, changing it from being based on land values to one based on population. In that instance, the northern states wanted slaves counted as 3/4 while the southern states wanted 1/2 or 1/4. They compromised at 3/5, but the amendment was never approved.
At the Constitutional Convention, however, the debate was far more about representation in the House and electoral votes, rather than taxation. While the taxation provision (slaves only counted as 3/5 for purposes of direct taxes on states) was included to induce the southern states to accept the compromise, the reality is that it never had any significant effect on taxation. From the article linked at the bottom:

Taxation and Slavery

State-based representational conflicts, however, coexisted with regionally-based conflicts. In fact, the struggle to reconcile the place of slavery in the new republic had more influence on the enumeration of federal tax authority in the Constitution than any other issue. The perplexing approach adopted with respect to direct taxation attested to slavery's impact.

Article I, Section 2 provided that "representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons . . . and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons." Similarly, Article I, Section 9 stated that "no capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herinbefore directed to be taken." The insertion of the direct tax clauses was not designed to protect the taxing power of states against the Federal government, or that of richer against poorer states. The delegates sought this compromise, rather, as a means to account for slaves when determining the number of southern congressional representatives.

 
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cosmickid

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In case anyone is questioning this...
The inmates truly are running the asylum...
 
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i'vegotwinners

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It was about money. States paid to the federal government based on their population. The South didn't want to pay taxes for each slave (Native Americans that did not pay tax were not counted at all). So the eventual compromise was they would count 3/5 for tax which also then meant they were 3/5 for representation. Native Americans counted zero toward representation. The argument wasn't over representation, it was really over taxation.

Not entirely accurate. The Three-Fifths Compromise sort of had some roots with respect to the Articles of Confederation. There was a proposal to amend the way taxes were levied on states, changing it from being based on land values to one based on population. In that instance, the northern states wanted slaves counted as 3/4 while the southern states wanted 1/2 or 1/4. They compromised at 3/5, but the amendment was never approved.
At the Constitutional Convention, however, the debate was far more about representation in the House and electoral votes, rather than taxation. While the taxation provision (slaves only counted as 3/5 for purposes of direct taxes on states) was included to induce the southern states to accept the compromise, the reality is that it never had any significant effect on taxation. From the article linked at the bottom:

Taxation and Slavery

State-based representational conflicts, however, coexisted with regionally-based conflicts. In fact, the struggle to reconcile the place of slavery in the new republic had more influence on the enumeration of federal tax authority in the Constitution than any other issue. The perplexing approach adopted with respect to direct taxation attested to slavery's impact.

Article I, Section 2 provided that "representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons . . . and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons." Similarly, Article I, Section 9 stated that "no capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herinbefore directed to be taken." The insertion of the direct tax clauses was not designed to protect the taxing power of states against the Federal government, or that of richer against poorer states. The delegates sought this compromise, rather, as a means to account for slaves when determining the number of southern congressional representatives.


maybe if you say it's about taxes, it's eligible for reconciliation, whereas if it's about representation, and taxes are merely a byproduct, it isn't. bwg

that said, we can always see what was done.

uncovering and/or proving one's actual motives and/or agendas in doing it, is always another story.

of course, politicians and business gentlemen would never lie.

that would just be unbecoming.
 
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cosmickid

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Headlines that start "State GOP..." have overtaken "A Florida man..." for WTF lunacy.
Not so fast... A certain Florida man has decided to uphold that state's Lunacy Legacy and is trying to stage a comeback... He's currently on tour with MTG, but I'm not sure which is the headlining act...

"Florida Republican Matt Gaetz is under a federal investigation concerning under-age sex, sex trafficking, and prostitution.

Gaetz has denied allegations of sexual misconduct and said in an interview that he has “a suspicion that someone is trying to recategorize my generosity to ex-girlfriends as something more untoward,” the New York Times reported.
In an April tweet, Gaetz doubled down on claims of extortion by government officials: “One of the people trying to extort me with lies is a former Department of Justice official. His name is David McGee,” said Gaetz.
“Another person trying to extort me with lies was *GETTING PAID* by the Department of State!!!”


Republican Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Republican Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
“I’m a marked man in Congress. I’m a canceled man in some corners of the Internet. I might be a wanted man by the deep state. But I am a Florida man, and it is good to be home,” said Gaetz."

 
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Spartans9312

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Not so fast... A certain Florida man has decided to uphold that state's Lunacy Legacy and is trying to stage a comeback... He's currently on tour with MTG, but I'm not sure which is the headlining act...

"Florida Republican Matt Gaetz is under a federal investigation concerning under-age sex, sex trafficking, and prostitution.

Gaetz has denied allegations of sexual misconduct and said in an interview that he has “a suspicion that someone is trying to recategorize my generosity to ex-girlfriends as something more untoward,” the New York Times reported.
In an April tweet, Gaetz doubled down on claims of extortion by government officials: “One of the people trying to extort me with lies is a former Department of Justice official. His name is David McGee,” said Gaetz.
“Another person trying to extort me with lies was *GETTING PAID* by the Department of State!!!”


Republican Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Republican Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
“I’m a marked man in Congress. I’m a canceled man in some corners of the Internet. I might be a wanted man by the deep state. But I am a Florida man, and it is good to be home,” said Gaetz."


You know you're having a good day when you're spinning your friend's guilty plea to child sex trafficking charges as good news for you.
 
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Noodle

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Hmmm...a school district receives, BY MAIL, an anonymous, TYPED letter purportedly from a student. Wonder how they figured out it was fake?
 

IU_Hickory

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Hmmm...a school district receives, BY MAIL, an anonymous, TYPED letter purportedly from a student. Wonder how they figured out it was fake?
Cyber Ninjas had some spare time when they were taking a break from their all important audit.